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Solar filters


Peter Reader
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Hi again everyone!

I have the Skywatcher 200P and I'd like t take a look at the sun. Is this all I need?:

http://telescopeplanet.co.uk/ViewProdDetails.asp?name=252mm%20to%20262mm%20Solar%20Filter%20-%20SkyWatcher%208%20inch%20Newtonians%20&prod_code=PON08K000008

If not what else?

Thanks

Pete

Edited by Peter Reader
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For white light, yes. You'll see sunspots, but you won't get the kind of detail that only a dedicated solar scope will give you such as a Coranado PST or Lunt, for example, or the solar scope filters for refractors made in the Isle of Man.

However, I'm not sure that even solar film is advisable for a reflector if you are not going to stop it down. I have used my TAL 150p newtonian, which has an off axis whole in the lens cap, thus stopping the apeture down, with baader solar film attached to the back of that and it works fine. From Pete Lawrence's comments on this months Sky at Night, a reflector may generate too much heat to work safely at full aperture, but whether that applies with solar film I'm not sure, but I'm sure someone more knowledgeable than I will guide you on that point.

White light solar observing can be fun and a green or contrast boost filter at the eyepiece end may tease out some more detail in combination with the white light filter on the objective.

REMEMBER, never look at the sun without a suitable filter - irrepairable eye damage will occur!

I trust you have heard of Telescope Planet's reputation? I see they claim the filters are in stock, good luck with that.

Brinders

Edited by Brinders
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Solar film will filter out the Suns energy before it enters the scope, so there is no need to stop down the aperture (unless you want to save on film of course!).

Pete Lawrence's comments were with regards to solar projection.

Regards

Richard

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Ive seen images of people using solar filters on reflectors. BIG reflectors

Yup. It's somewhat rare to get full value from the resolution a big scope can bring when observing the sun, because the sun has a tendency to cause rather a lot of atmospheric turbulence causing wobbly seeing, but when the air is steady the results can be spectacular.

Of course you also need the sun to be something other than blank in white light ....

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Yup. It's somewhat rare to get full value from the resolution a big scope can bring when observing the sun, because the sun has a tendency to cause rather a lot of atmospheric turbulence causing wobbly seeing, but when the air is steady the results can be spectacular.

Of course you also need the sun to be something other than blank in white light ....

Thats the exciting part of white light solar observing for me. You just never know when you are gonna pick up a sunspot or two. In saying that there has been times when i KNOW there is activity on the Sun but i simply could not detect it with my scope (90EQ). I guess i should have ramped up the magnification but then its like looking for a needle in a haystack.

I'll keep looking though. It gives me something to do during the day when i am not busy working or watering my herbs.

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