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I have a theory


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Now I don't know what you'd call something like this? It's not really a 'theory', and I don't think it's completely a 'fantasy' either... yet it isn't doable in the near future.

I think the word is "speculation".

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These thing are always interesting. The "morality" of one-way trips, lasting 150+ human generations, perhaps even more than the (fairly believable) technology. I do wonder just how our ancestors from 50,000 years ago would perceive us. :)

Edited by Macavity
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These thing are always interesting. The "morality" of one-way trips, lasting 150+ human generations, perhaps even more than the (fairly believable) technology.

Quite. If the last 150 generations of your family had been living on a space ship -- would you ever want to arrive??

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These thing are always interesting. The "morality" of one-way trips, lasting 150+ human generations, perhaps even more than the (fairly believable) technology. I do wonder just how our ancestors from 50,000 years ago would perceive us. :)

It does make you wonder about the science of evolution. 150+ human generations evolving along a different path to Earth-bound humanity. A sub branch of homo sapiens. Could they end up being so different from us?

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Could they end up being so different from us?
Indeed so. I did actually read a book about this, a long time ago. <G> But another striking thing: If, in the intervening time, remaining humanity (by some means!) develops "Warp Technology": As we merrily overtake them, on their multi-millenia voyage, should we "hail" them, to tell them the "good news"? Or would it be better (as I suspect) to quietly leave them well alone... But I suspect they too would always wonder! Makes ya think... :) Edited by Macavity
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For me, the morality issue would depend on the reason the trip was being made. I'd be a willing participant if we were the lone survivors of a doomed Earth and needed a new place to live (Superman scenario). But if it was an journey of exploration and colonization, i just wouldn't be able to go. I love Earth too much, and can't imagine cheating my children and grandchildren of the experience of living here.

They'd never know how beautiful the air smells after a Summer rain, or how wonderfully cool it feels on sunburned skin. They'd never see a Fawn hiding in the Bracken ferns, or hear the hypnotic sound of the Wood Thrush floating through the forest at dusk.

Yes, i realize there's a lot of not-so-idyllic things about living here, but i couldn't deny my offspring the wonderful beauty i've experienced.

JMHO, YMMV :)

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Who knows what potential scenarios there will be, that might herald the demise of the human race. We are aware of Asteroid/Comet collision possibilities. Man's own destructive nature may take a hand in possible extinction, and all these may propel mankind to try and preserve his own species by adopting the OP's Idea. Of course all the afore mentioned possibilities may come too quickly to allow such a venture to proceed. Much preparation would be required, and time would be limited indeed.

Should man be fortunate to survive until such time as our suns own demise is nigh, he would be aware long before the sun swells to encompass the inner planets, and therefore the Interstellar generational journey would be the only option open.

Whether by that time, technology would have permitted identifying habitable planets in other star systems is a matter for conjecture.

If not, then the trip would still be the only hope, but it would be a lottery, and whether it would succeed, would only be known by the generation that would not be born for many many years.

There's the hope that human intelligence and behaviour will develop sufficiently to fully appreciate the simple, but Oh so Important things Carol spoke of, and appreciate the beautiful gifts this planet has given him, and in doing so, abandon all thought of self destruction, and disposing of at least one of the threats to his existence.

Ron.:)

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They'd never know how beautiful the air smells after a Summer rain, or how wonderfully cool it feels on sunburned skin. They'd never see a Fawn hiding in the Bracken ferns, or hear the hypnotic sound of the Wood Thrush floating through the forest at dusk.

Yes, i realize there's a lot of not-so-idyllic things about living here, but i couldn't deny my offspring the wonderful beauty i've experienced.

JMHO, YMMV :mad:

I too love nature very much. I wouldn't ride in that thing if it weren't for it's very 'idyllic' environment.

Consider that we'd have the spectacle of colourful wildflowers swaying in the gentle summer breeze in the Centauri Princess' meadows, and the scent of water hyacinths stirred up from the waters of the Eridanus River:

Eridanus River - First Ark to Alpha Centauri Wiki

There is also a vast range of wildlife roaming across 437 square km's of picturesque pine forests:

Black Forest - First Ark to Alpha Centauri Wiki

I believe the best way to colonise any space environment (on the moon, on mars or inside an ark like this in middle of nowhere) is to take all our creature comforts with us when we go...

:)

Edited by Starfleet
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