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Dark Amender

Anything Interesting to look for ?

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Hi,

i am wondering wat to look for... I have only seen the basics and want to see more! I have seen: Saturn, Mars, Orion Nebula, Andromeda Galaxy (but the faintest ever small blob), The Seven Sinsters, and thats it... is there anything interesting that is pritty big in your eypiece? (i have 20mm(45x Magnification) and a 10mm(90x Magnification) and i have a pair of 10x50 binoculars. i am itching to see something quite big... as in when u look in the eypice it looks like say 1-2cm... So is there anything interesting such as a nebula or Globular Cluster ect.

Thanks a lot,

Dark Amender

Edited by Dark Amender

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Hi DA

I think you might have got your eyepiece magnifications the wrong way round. There are plenty of beautiful open clusters that will fill your field of view. Go to Mars and then move to the left and down a bit and you will easily find the cluster Praesepe or the Beehive (M44). It's like the Seven Sisters (M45 or the Pleiades) only better. Then go back to Mars and keep going to your right into the Constellation Auriga. This looks like a five-sided 'pentagon' with the bright star Capella top right. In the lower left section of this Pentagon shape are 3 lovely open clusters - M36, M37 and M38. You will pick all these out with your binos but you'll get a much better view with the scope.

The second best Globular Cluster (IMHO) is M3 which is directly above the bright star Arcturus in the Eastern sky. The best globular (M13) is further to the East in Hercules but it's a bit low in the sky at present.

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I know this will sound bad but there is a lot of information in a book.

I have the monthly sky guide on the floor, unopened at the moment, but I will guarantee that if I look up March and the 3-4 pages given over to it I would read of 15-20 things up there in the constellation that it has highlighted for March.

Even getting a very basic book on constellations and searching the internet would turn up a lot. Wikipedia will I suspect have a page per constellation and will identify what is in it. The wikipedia list of Messiers is a start.

TLAO lists I think 100 interesting items, always seems a bit of a cheat when there are 110 Messiers without having to bother with anything else.;):eek: such as double stars and major stars on the constellations.

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