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views with a 10" dobsonian


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A smidge better than the 8" on DSO's but not massively so. Visually, the planets show no real difference. I wouldn't bother with that jump again, would have to be 12" to be worthwhile.

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I've currently got a 10" and I've owned 8" and 12" dobs. I'd agree with Russ - you really need to consider a 4" jump to get performance increases that are really noticable. I "down sized" for reasons of ease of use and portability and it's worked because my 10" is getting used all the time. As well as a noticable step up in performance an 12" is a rather noticable step up in size, weight and bulk as well !.

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okay so go for a 12" i mean i think the dobsonians are fab u find then much easier to use, what sort of details would u see with the 12"

kelly

The benefits are mostly on deep sky objects where you can actually start to see views a little like some of the photos from a dark sky sight. I saw the spiral arms of the galaxy M51 with a 12" dob at the SGL4 star party last year and it was a fabulous sight :headbang:

Of course many of the galaxies are still faint blobs but you can see more of them - in fact you find yourself stumbling over them in some parts of the sky with a 12" !. Globular clusters are also superb - the brighter ones are resolved into stars right across their cores.

I think you do need acess to a dark sky site to really get the best out of a large aperture dobsonian though. My back garden has some light pollution so it's not really ideal - another reason I downgraded from a 12" - my viewing conditions just did not really do it justice :p

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You still won't see much, if any colour in DSO's though, being honest - maybe some green in M42. It's our eyes you see, rather than the scope. Filters and eyepieces don't change this. UHC and OIII filters do help a lot with contrast on nebluae, especially planetary nebulae.

Edited by John
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well i'm a little luckier i actually drive about 5mins away and there a centre which has a nice big car park and its quite dark there, amazing!! yep my backgarden is very light polluted too , and it has decking to its no too god fore viewing coz the scope is always shaking :headbang: thats why i get away from it lol.

K

xx

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A dark sky is what really makes a difference. Seeing M51 in the 50mm finder is a lasting memory from Kelling 2004. I struggle to see it back home in the main scope.

The 10" would be worth getting providing the extra outlay over your current 8" isn't too much. I had the 8 and 10 out side by side a couple of weeks ago. And can say hand on heart the difference wouldn't be worth much more than £50-70 more than what your 8" is worth.

That said, i was really suprised just how light the 10 was. I remember my old XT10 being heavier but perhaps time has dulled my memory. The 10 was not any more trouble than the 8 really.

I did find the 10 less stable on it's dob base compared to the 8.

A good quality widefield eyepiece is a great addition to the 8. It's great surfing the with a 13mm-16mm Ultra Wide, like a Nagler, UWAN or Nirvana.

Russ

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If you have an 8 inch dob and you want to move to a larger scope I believe you should be looking for a scope with a primary mirror twice the area as the mirror on the 8. An 8 inch mirror is 50.3 square inches, a 10 inch mirror is 78.5, a 12 is 113.1, a 14 is 154 and a 16 is 200. So if I am correct the next step form an 8 would be a 12 or greater.

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