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Full moon, clear skies


acey
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Full moon tonight, and guess what, the forecast is once again for a clear sky to go with it. It's uncanny! Surely someone must have proposed a theory for why there seems to be a correlation - or is it just sod's law?

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Given that there is a full moon during the hours of darkness at every location on Earth within a 24-hour period, if there was a scientific link as suggested, there would be no cloud on Earth at all during the hours of darkness. Clearly an impossibility !! :)

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Yeah, my messier-spotting has slowed right down. Fortunatly, I have a binocular double stars list that I'm working through during moonwashed skies. Perhaps a bright objects list for moonwashed nights and UK cities should be put together.

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I've been logging the number of clear skies around new moon and full moon here in Taunton since August 2006 - up until June 2008 we had 8 clear nights within 2 nights of new moon and 30 clear nights within 2 nights of full moon. Something happened in June 2008 where the numbers of clear nights around either phase began to be more equal to the extent that after some 43 lunations we've had 31 clear nights around new moon and 57 around full... it's still pretty showing that full moon is indeed clearer...

James

PS... I've also logged the number of nights I've been able to actually get out and observe around each phase - it's 17 for new moon and 38 for full moon... that's really not fair :)

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I've been logging the number of clear skies around new moon and full moon here in Taunton since August 2006 - up until June 2008 we had 8 clear nights within 2 nights of new moon and 30 clear nights within 2 nights of full moon. Something happened in June 2008 where the numbers of clear nights around either phase began to be more equal to the extent that after some 43 lunations we've had 31 clear nights around new moon and 57 around full... it's still pretty showing that full moon is indeed clearer...

James

PS... I've also logged the number of nights I've been able to actually get out and observe around each phase - it's 17 for new moon and 38 for full moon... that's really not fair :eek:

James...you have too much time on your hands...:(:)

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Given that there is a full moon during the hours of darkness at every location on Earth within a 24-hour period,

How does that work? :):confused:

I'm not saying you are wrong, I just dont get it, not good with things like that :(

Are there any other activities which tend to happen or are planned for full moons which might have an impact on weather patterns?

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Given that there is a full moon during the hours of darkness at every location on Earth within a 24-hour period, if there was a scientific link as suggested, there would be no cloud on Earth at all during the hours of darkness. Clearly an impossibility !! :)

Um, no there isn't... full moon is at a precise moment in time when it's on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun.

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Um, no there isn't... full moon is at a precise moment in time when it's on the opposite side of the Earth from the Sun.

If you take full moon to be a precise time...which is the correct way to do it...then of course you are right.

What we are talking about here is the night when the moon "appears" full, even though it might be a few hours before or after the precise time. Most place on Earth (poles excluded) could see the moon full / near full on the night before and after the astronomical time of full moon. :)

Edited by DarkerSky
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How does that work? :):confused:

I'm not saying you are wrong, I just dont get it, not good with things like that :eek:

Are there any other activities which tend to happen or are planned for full moons which might have an impact on weather patterns?

The moon appears at its fullest when the moon is on its orbital path around the Earth at the point where it is directly opposite from the sun. The Earth rotates every 24 hours independently of the moon, so therefore every longitudinal co-ordination rotates through that plane between Moon and Sun...something like that :(

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