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Not good Vibrations


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Hi,

Does anyone know if the tripod vibration pads are any good? I have to mount on decking and I've noticed there is quite a bit of movement in the EP. If I mount on my lawn I narrow my FOV down due to our willow tree (which is very discreetly getting smaller day by day as I nip bits off. My wife will kill me if she 'twigs' what i'm doing) I'm not sure how good the pads are and would like to know peoples views on them.

Thanks

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If you have physical movement in the decking the scope will move - the pads will quiken up the damping time - also good if accidently nudging..etc at high power....

I would have thought decking is much more forgiving to vibrations than more solid patio's...etc

You could also use sections of an old rubber mat - if you want a cheap solution.

Chris

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Setting up on decking (wood) is not a good idea (as said aready). Also setting up on concrete is not ideal as concrete retains heat which is released at night and causes heat thermals infront of scope. Best surface to set up on is grass. No heat is retained and also the scope wil settle down into the grass and vibrations will disapate into the ground and be less of a problem.

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Yup, you got it, as I move the decking moves, and consequently the scope.;) Its not the best place to mount but its the only one that gives me a good view. Drilling decking,:) now there is an idea, have to give that one some thought.

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Yup, you got it, as I move the decking moves, and consequently the scope.;) Its not the best place to mount but its the only one that gives me a good view. Drilling decking,:) now there is an idea, have to give that one some thought.

Just an idea: Maybe you could lift that area of the deck and add something beneath it to stabilize the area, then mount the deck again. That way you would avoid leaving holes in it, keep it looking nice and get the stability you need. Maybe some support wood or even a concrete plate.

Edited by pvaz
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Perhaps a large square of MDF that could cover the tripod area and moresome...

This way the MDF movement will be minimal across its area against individual movement from slats or deck squares...etc ?

Chris

I really dont think wood (sheet wood) is the way to go. I think Pvaz has it. Perhaps some breeze blocks below the decking for the legs of the tripod to sit on. Even bore a hole (depression) in each block to fit the tripod legs.....to give stability.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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Perhaps some breeze blocks below the decking for the legs of the tripod to sit on.

I think that's a good idea, If I block out below the tripod feet under the decking and leave them just proud of the joists, when I screw the deck down that part should be supported by the blocks and not the decking frame....

Thanks for your ideas :)

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Thanks for all your help on this, I took the decking up and blocked out with bricks below where the tripod sits, and it works a treat. Not as good as on the grass, but at 200x very very little movement now. ;)

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