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Some deepsky...


fmeireso
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Clear skies. For a couple of hours. So pulled the new toy out: the Apollo 22x85.

It was cold so i was not really motivated to set the big one up especially if you don't know how much time it will stay clear. That's why binos are so convenient

Target was M35 and surroundings. M35 was pretty big, full of stars.But I've seen thatone before. I went inside to get my U2000 book to look where NGC 2158 exactly was. I took me some time get figure it out but once i nailed the exact location i could see it as fuzzy round spot if i looked averted.

I found that very nice,since i never saw it in such a small aperture from my backyard.

During the observation i allready saw another fuzzy spot at about 2 oclock. At first i thought those were some faint fuzzy stars but it revealed itself when i searched for IC 2156/7 which turned out to be the fuzzy spot. I could not see 2 starclusters but it showed itself as one fuzzy spot.

Lateron i caught the Eskimo nebuale, easy found, easy to see, small, round , like a fuzzy star.Also some other open clusters like NGC 1647,NGC 1746, big clusters in Taurus

M81 and 82 very well seen in those Apollo babies..wow..

M42 is astounding ..big nebuala, even detail in it, averted vision reveals it's long arms.

When i made plans to hunt for M108 and M97 clouds turned up...end of the fun.

Those 22x85 are really nice bino's. They reveal alot even in my rather poor skies.They are quickly set up but yet give enough aperture to do some real deep sky with wide views.

Al by it a nice session, only a bit short!

Edited by fmeireso
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Lovely 'new toy' report, thanks! :icon_eek: I read somewhere that the eye-brain connection allows more information to be transmitted when we use two eyes instead of one, and it actually increases the magnitude we can detect. It might be why your Apollos reveal so much in your 'rather poor skies'. I bet that 18" Obsession doesn't do too bad either. :)

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Carol,

Two eyes are indeed better then one. I believe one wins about 10-12% lightgathering capacity. And the Apollos (= Garrett 22x85) do have great transmission. Also the rather big FOV is nice to have. But they are HEAVY...

Yeah, the Obsession does nice, especially at our dark site just over the border in the Netherlands where i win at least half a magnitude. But also in my backyard if the skies are good (rather seldom in Belgium lately) one can do deep. Globs like M5,M1,M3 are just stunning, can get enough of those but also faint stuff like Arp galaxies can be seen, takes some more motivation though....

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Lovely 'new toy' report, thanks! :icon_eek: I read somewhere that the eye-brain connection allows more information to be transmitted when we use two eyes instead of one, and it actually increases the magnitude we can detect. It might be why your Apollos reveal so much in your 'rather poor skies'. I bet that 18" Obsession doesn't do too bad either. :)

That's interesting. I certainly notice a big difference when observing with my 20X90s. They seem to cut through sky glow and very bright moonlight almost as if there was none.

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My current frustrations with my scope and mount (which I'm sure I'll resolve) did make me appreciate the ease of using binoculars, particularly on misty nights when a scope will only be usuable for short periods of time.

My own bins are poor cousins to yours but still give a good view of some of the most obvious deep sky objects. The two eye versus one discussion was something I was unaware of. Nice post.

Edited by Wiltshiresaint
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The two eye versus one discussion was something I was unaware of.

The lightgathering increase is more about 20% and not 10-12% as i stated earlier. I've found this on CN in one of EDz writings.

So a 85 mm bin has more or less the lightgathering capacity of a 100 mm monocular lens. Of course that is only if the bino is a truly 85 mm.

Most of them don't get their specs. Many 80 mm bin has only between 71 and 75 mm aperture.

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Revenge ! The skies cleared about 11:30 PM after being overcast for the whole evening.

I took the Apollo outside hunting for M108 and M97. These are dim difficult targets for small scopes. I needed my U2000 for their exact location.

First I found M97, dim, very dim, but actually not that difficult once you've caught it. Surprisingly bigger then expected.Round schape, no detail of course.

I took me some time to get M108. I'tried to see them both at thesame time , did'nt work. I had to center the location and yep there it was, fading in, fading out.Again bigger then i expected..difficult, but seen, very dim on edge galaxie. I've seen it many times in my Obsession but never in binoculars!

I am so thrilled...

Edited by fmeireso
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Yes,Carol it is, but of course you have to realize magnification is limited.A 120 mm refractor at 50x (wich is rather low) will show allready alot more then & power of 20 or 25.

Also probably many binos don't achieve their spec unfortunately meaning an 100 mm may wind up being a 90-95mm.Many but not all; the high end like a fujinon 70 mm is truly a 70 mm...

Following measurments of Edz (CN) the Apollo 22x85 reaches 84 mm true aperture....that's very good.

But never mind the tech stuff, let's just enjoy them...

Edited by fmeireso
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Yes,Carol it is, but of course you have to realize magnification is limited.A 120 mm refractor at 50x (wich is rather low) will show allready alot more then & power of 20 or 25.

It won't be a scientific study or anything, just a fun and interesting comparison. I've done this sort of thing in the past and always take care to match the magnification as closely as possible. :)

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I know, Carol, i am always tempted to do thesame just to find out. The optics itself are part of the hobby..and if you make the comparison i will be most curious of your findings..

Edited by fmeireso
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I've been a fan of BIG binoculars and binoscopes since I made a pair of 25x125 in the early '70's. I think the main perceived improvement over single unit performance comes from signal to noise ratio. Using a single optic presents the brain with signal from one eye and noise from the other. The brain makes use of the signal and rejects the noise so when two signals are received via a binocular the brain combines both of these as a natural "Registax" thereby enhancing the image as reported. Using a binoviewer however, reduces the amount of light available but not as much as expected beacause of the two signal benefit.The other big advantage is the relaxation of the eyes when binocular viewing leading to easier resolution of detail. Try closing one eye momentarily whilst using binoculars to see the difference.

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True, the views are 'stacked' and one sees just more. I tried the one eye aproach and yes indeed one sees instantly ...that you see less with one eye.

One thing i don't get : with 2 eyes the views seems 'bigger' say more imersive. It's not the magnification but it's just bigger.

That effect remains in a binoviewer. I once saw the moon in a binoviewer on a Newt.

Big image...quite stunning.

But i don't know why that is.

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