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Lunar Imaging with Canon 350d and Skywatcher 150pl


PhoenixRising
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Hi,

I got a scope a few weeks ago and have only been out twice!

This evening I took some pics of the moon through crappy conditions. Two things struck me:

1 - I can take pics with the supplied barlow lense (Skywatcher Deluxe x2) screwed into my camera, but if I insert the camera into the telescope with the barlow lense unscrewed, I cant focus the camera well enough to take a shot. So I can get close ups but not a full shot of the moon. I can place the camera up to a fitted eyepiece but it always looks naff. Any ideas?

2 - If I want to take pics of stars does anyone have any advice, I have to set the iso to 800 just to get the moon!

Any help appreciated ;)

PS it is pretty misty here hence the fuzzy pics. Plus these are my first attempts in Rubbish conditions! Gotta get the excuses in quick :(

phoenixrising-albums-first-astrophotography-attempts-picture3187-camera-held-up-eyepiece-misty-conditions.jpg

Pic taken with camera held upto 18x eyepiece.

phoenixrising-albums-first-astrophotography-attempts-picture3186-took-barlow-x2-misty-conditions.jpg

Pic taken with Barlow x2 lense screwed onto Canon dslr 350d.

Sorry for the pics and attachments both attached to this post, Im still learning the ropes.

post-17562-133877407597_thumb.jpg

post-17562-133877407603_thumb.jpg

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And learning quickly! The 2nd image is very nice indeed!!

So, without the barlow lens, the camera does not come to focus. This is a known issue with newtonians. There is insufficient inward focus to allow the chip to reach the focal point. The solutions are 1) Use a barlow 2) Move the mirror further up the tube or 3) Change the focuser for a low profile one.

Most people will opt for the barlow or focuser change....

To stack the images together, look for Registax - its free and pretty straightforward to use. But, feel free to ask questions :icon_eek:

Now, stars. Its not the ISO that's important (well, it is) but the exposure duration. You'll need to expose for, say, 20 seconds to get a decent set of stars. If your mount is manual then you'll see some trailing of the stars - and indeed if you mount is motorised and not accurately polar aligned, you'll get the same result!!

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I should also say focus is everything. Take time to get this right, especially on the moon - no amount of processing and stacking will correct bad focus!!

Registax will handle the RAW images from the camera as well.

Let us know how you get on :icon_eek:

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