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Jupiter & GRS at last!


Brinders
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At last I've caught Jupiter's Great Red Spot for the first time!

Captured at 20.32 Monday October 12 2009. Celestron Neximage set at 5fps and shutter set at 1/5 sec attached to a Celestron CPC 925 GPS with a Skywatcher 2" ED barlow 277 frames from 300 stacked in Registax 5.

I'm really pleased with this for such a modest camera.

Brinders

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Thanks for the kind comments guys. I hope to repeat the exercise sometime when the seeing is better and hopefully arrive at a sharper image. But at least I've now seen the GRS with my own eyes and obtained a reasonable image - I'm happy! :D

Brinders

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At last I've caught Jupiter's Great Red Spot for the first time!

Captured at 20.32 Monday October 12 2009. Celestron Neximage set at 5fps and shutter set at 1/5 sec attached to a Celestron CPC 925 GPS with a Skywatcher 2" ED barlow 277 frames from 300 stacked in Registax 5.

I'm really pleased with this for such a modest camera.

Brinders

Nice work Brinders

what capture software did you use? K3CCD ?

was it a video shot or single frames? sorry for silly questions I am still a rookie in imaging

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Nice work Brinders

what capture software did you use? K3CCD ?

was it a video shot or single frames? sorry for silly questions I am still a rookie in imaging

Hi,

Yes, I should have said: K3CCD Tools was used to capture the AVIs, which are the frames of a video. A total of 300 frames at 5 fps were captured. 277 of the best AVI frames selected by Registax 5 were then stacked within the software and also processed within Registax (wavelets, RGB align and contract/brightness were all adjusted). The resulting image was saved as a BMP file enlarged by 200% and then opened and saved in PaintShop Pro X as a JPEG for posting on the forum.

Hope that helps,

Brinders.

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Great image, you made the right call with the new scope.

Hi David,

Yes I'm very pleased with my new scope. It's a lot faster setting up and putting away again each session with it breaking down into only two components and no need to polar align. I think this new scope will be a keeper.

Brinders

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Hi,

Yes, I should have said: K3CCD Tools was used to capture the AVIs, which are the frames of a video. A total of 300 frames at 5 fps were captured. 277 of the best AVI frames selected by Registax 5 were then stacked within the software and also processed within Registax (wavelets, RGB align and contract/brightness were all adjusted). The resulting image was saved as a BMP file enlarged by 200% and then opened and saved in PaintShop Pro X as a JPEG for posting on the forum.

Hope that helps,

Brinders.

Awesome:icon_salut:

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Hi,

Yes, I should have said: K3CCD Tools was used to capture the AVIs, which are the frames of a video. A total of 300 frames at 5 fps were captured. 277 of the best AVI frames selected by Registax 5 were then stacked within the software and also processed within Registax (wavelets, RGB align and contract/brightness were all adjusted). The resulting image was saved as a BMP file enlarged by 200% and then opened and saved in PaintShop Pro X as a JPEG for posting on the forum.

Hope that helps,

Brinders.

Brinders

what is the difference of 5fps or 15fps ?

apologies for many questions:icon_salut:

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Brinders

what is the difference of 5fps or 15fps ?

apologies for many questions:icon_salut:

FPS = Frames per second (the number of frames captured by the CCD per second - a little like the old movie film stock moving across the gate of the motion film camera). Normal video is usually around 24 fps I think. Frames per second, gain and shutter speed (exposure) all contribute to whether the picture is over/under exposed or just right.

Turning the gain up increases sensitivity but increases noise (like using a faster film speed) while the shutter determines how much light reaches the CCD for a given speed (the same as the shutter in a film camera). One variable you cannot control is aperture which is limited by your telescope which is, of course, acting as your camera lens unless you use a neutral density or polarizing filter to reduce the amount of light reaching the CCD However, in astro photography, unless its the moon, you are likely to want all the light you can get. You can, however vary the brightness and contrast in the capture software.

The art is to get gain, FPS and shutter speed plus brightness/contrast all successfully combined to get a properly exposed image onto the CCD and therefore the computer screen. However, the limitations of your equipment (and the Neximage is basically a web cam) will necessarily mean you have to compromise between getting an accepatable image and all out quality, but that's true of most photography anyway!

Web cams also compress the information that they are receiving which can lead to unwanted artifacts. By reducing the FPS you get a less compressed signal hopefully giving a better picture but one that may be harder to focus, so I focus and compose at 25 - 30 FPS and reduce it to 5 FPS for capture. More expensive specialised camera, such as those form the Imaging Source, will allow higher frame rates for a given exposure.

I know little about the technical side of astro photography, but the above is gleaned for over 30 years as a pro-am photographer and I see no reason why those general principals cannot be transferred across and so I have little doubt that it is basically correct - seems to be working for me, anyhow. :D

Brinders

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FPS = Frames per second (the number of frames captured by the CCD per second - a little like the old movie film stock moving across the gate of the motion film camera). Normal video is usually around 24 fps I think. Frames per second, gain and shutter speed (exposure) all contribute to whether the picture is over/under exposed or just right.

Turning the gain up increases sensitivity but increases noise (like using a faster film speed) while the shutter determines how much light reaches the CCD for a given speed (the same as the shutter in a film camera). One variable you cannot control is aperture which is limited by your telescope which is, of course, acting as your camera lens unless you use a neutral density or polarizing filter to reduce the amount of light reaching the CCD However, in astro photography, unless its the moon, you are likely to want all the light you can get. You can, however vary the brightness and contrast in the capture software.

The art is to get gain, FPS and shutter speed plus brightness/contrast all successfully combined to get a properly exposed image onto the CCD and therefore the computer screen. However, the limitations of your equipment (and the Neximage is basically a web cam) will necessarily mean you have to compromise between getting an accepatable image and all out quality, but that's true of most photography anyway!

Web cams also compress the information that they are receiving which can lead to unwanted artifacts. By reducing the FPS you get a less compressed signal hopefully giving a better picture but one that may be harder to focus, so I focus and compose at 25 - 30 FPS and reduce it to 5 FPS for capture. More expensive specialised camera, such as those form the Imaging Source, will allow higher frame rates for a given exposure.

I know little about the technical side of astro photography, but the above is gleaned for over 30 years as a pro-am photographer and I see no reason why those general principals cannot be transferred across and so I have little doubt that it is basically correct - seems to be working for me, anyhow. :D

Brinders

Thank you Brinders

for interest explanation:headbang:

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