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Levdr

My first DSO: M42

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Last night I woke up, about an hour before dawn, looked out the window and saw that the South-South-Eastern quadrant of the sky was crystal clear, and there it was: Orion. In al its glory. My mouth dropped. I could see things with the naked eye that on other nights I could hardly see through my binoculars. I then looked through those binoculars and the view was stunning. Now I had looked at Orion before, but just to make out its make up so to speak, to learn the constellation as a whole. Now, for the first time, I felt I could maybe see the Great Nebula I had seen so many breathtaking images off. I knew where to find it and almost immediately did. There could be no mistake: I was in fact looking at M42! I was so excited I almost dropped my binoculars. Then, after a while I went back to just using my eyes and with the help of a bit of peripheral view at first, I could see the nebula again. Very faint, very fuzzy, just a little smudge really, but unmistakably there. Isn't it great that once you know where to look exactly, and once you know what to look for, you can find so much more? I then hurried (as dawn was pending!) and took some photographs where you can clearly see the nebula. Wow, I have actually seen my first Messier Object!

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Congratulations and jubilations on your first Messier Levina !! :):icon_salut:It's a great feeling isn't it?.... and what a one to start with...I've never seen it myself and I'm really looking forward to this one later in the year when it gets a bit higher in the sky for me.the images on here of it are amazing aren't they....:)

I couldn't quite believe my eyes when I first saw the ring nebula in lyra M57 (my first messier)... had to rub my eyes and check the eyepiece for greasy smudges ! :) no it was M57!.

I still check in on it frequently as it's a lovely area of the sky...I can highly recomend it.

regards craig.

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Thank you Craig. Yes, it was a very special feeling. M57 in Lyra must wait until Spring. It's position right now is to the west, and for me that's in the direction of the centre of the city and the sky is glowing yellowish there. Bright Vega can not be missed, but I can't distinguish anything else right now. During the Winter months Lyra will be too close to the horizon, if it surfaces at all, but in the Spring it should be right where I have the best chance of seeing it and hopefully find M57: high up in the North Eastern sky. So much sky to explore! :)

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Well done Levina spotting M42. It's a great deep space object which you could study for ages. The only way is up now so onwards to number 2 :)

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M42 was my first too, and a firm favorite. Orion is great constellation, an easily recognizable pattern and many stars than can be used as guideposts, you can learn loads of the sky by following Orions lines. Congratulations on getting your first Messier!

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