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goatshoes

Jupiter will not allow me to photo her!!!

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Everytime I shoot Jupiter...regardless of the ISO and exposure time I get a messy blur....any tips? I have a Celestron 130SLT and am using a Canon 450D with a barlow X2.. Thanks!:)

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Hi GS

How are you doing it ? are you doing it afocal & handheld (shooting thru the eyepiece) ? or is the camera attached to the scope ?.

If you are doing it afocal it could be your hand shaking.

If the camera is attached to the scope it could be the mirror making the scope shake slightly as it opens and closes.

Could it have been turbulance? was it a windy night ?

Just some suggestions

Greenkat

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Hi goatshoes,

If you are imaging afocally, try an adaptor like this Adaptors - Skywatcher Universal Camera Adapter

It'll hold your camera steady and so minimise shake. Does your camera allow you to put a small delay between button-pressing and the actual taking of the shot? This delay will help to minimise the shake that can come through as you press the capture button. You could try a remote system to help with this too.

If the image is overexposed you won't pick up surface detail on Jupiter. Continue to experiment with the ISO setting and exposure time and see what detail each setting brings out.

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Everytime I shoot Jupiter...regardless of the ISO and exposure time I get a messy blur....any tips? I have a Celestron 130SLT and am using a Canon 450D with a barlow X2.. Thanks!:)

DSLRs are not the best for planets, a web cam or CCD imager that captures video and stacking the best AVI frames in an application such as Registax is the best solution. You may get reasonable results with the moon though, otherwise DSLRs are better suited to deep sky and wide field.

Incidently, you have mistaken the Jovial giant as a female. As the king of the gods (and therefore the planets) Jupiter may not be in such a jolly mood with you! All the major planets beyond earth are named after Roman gods apart from one: Venus is the only female - the goddess of lurve.:grin:

Brinders

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Jupiter is pretty low so we have to look at it through a lot of atmosphere. This causes the image to 'wobble' about which will always blur a still photo. That's why web cams work best for lunar / planets as they take pics at about 25 frames per second which can then be alligned, optimised and stacked in software like Registax.

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Thanks, everyone. I am using a T-mount adapter so I am shooting through the scope....it's odd becasue through the scope, via eyepieces, I can see the cloud bands etc....then when I insert the camera, all fails. Zero detail...can anyone recomend a fairly "cheap" ccd or webcam......my head is spinning with disapointment and exitment.....I hope I haven't upset our Gassy male planet.

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I have even used various colored filters to try and illiminate the vicous glow....to no avail. Also, I am using a remote shutter release plus a 2 second delay after that.....

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I have used a Celestron Neximage, which is basically a modified web cam, with mixed results and can be picked up at reasonable prices new. Otherwise you may find a Phillips spc900nc with a telescope adapter (uses the same chip as the Neximage) if you are lucky secondhand (Phillips no longer make them). After that, you may wish to consider a camera from the Imaging Source stable, which is what I'm considering to replace the Neximage:-

Imaging Source

Brinders

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You say you remove the eyepiece and insert the camera.....do you re-focus after inserting the cam---just a thought!

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What ever method you use, clearly you will have to refocus the telescope with the camera attached. If you are using a DSLR and you have live view try focusing using that function, otherwise it must be through the viewfinder (the telescope is effectively just another lens). If you use a web cam then you focus using the on screen image through whatever capture software you are using, such as K3CCD Tools. If you use a compact digital camera with an eyepiece adapter, I have found the auto focus works okay on the moon (never tried it with the planets), but you may have to keep refocusing until you get an acceptable image.

Hope that helps.

Brinders

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Incidentally, try using different manual exposure settings - Jupter is actually quite bright. Your camera will not expose correctly on manual (it sees too much of the black sky and so overexposes Jupiter).

Brinders

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Thanks...I do refocus constantly...I tried high ISO(1600) settings for quick shots at up to 1/4000 of a second as well as up to 10 Sec exposures at low Iso(100)...maybe I'm just cursed.

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hi goatshoes.

i also have a 130 slt and about the only thing i can photograph is the moon.think i have read somewhere that it cant focus due to not enough in travel(think thats term) on the focuser.

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I have a similar problem. I have Canon PowerShot A580 and rings that I use for attaching the camera to my EP. I've tried making photos of the Moon and Double Cluster and the images are fine. Well, they still suck much because I'll need to go through at least several manuals before I will show my images here.:) But at least I can see some details on the photos - stars in the Cluster and Moon features. Then I continued my experiment and pointed telescope at Jupiter. And it surprised me a lot. No matter what ISO and exposure I used the result was almost identical - a very bright spot. Well, the brightness varied when I was changing ISO and exposure but even at ISO=80 and exposure=1sec (the lowest for my camera) I was getting something that can never be recognized as a planet. To give you a better idea of my issue, I attach a photo. I don't remember the exact ISO-exposure settings for this photo. I have dozens of these nice white circles and, trust me, they don't vary much from ISO=80 to ISO=1600. So....what am I doing wrong? :grin:

post-16617-133877395533_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Jarralad and Crovax.....We're all in the same boat of limtations I guess and we must make it work somehow...I am off to photgraph in the clear chilly night!

Gino

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Crovax,

I think a second for Jupiter is much too long. When I tried a few weeks ago I'm sure I was using something more like 1/40th. As stated earlier it's wobbling around a lot because of the atmosphere and its low elevation. The best I could get was somthing that looked like an orange humbug with my C80-ED. The red and blue on your photo is probably due to atmospheric refraction. Your longer exposure has picked up one of the moons but it's been smudged out into a line. My photos only showed faint traces of the moons.

Keep trying

Alan

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Thanks for your help! Unfortunately the lowest exposure I can get is 1sec so I guess no Jupiter for me. I'll concentrate on DSOs then. :)

Yeah, that smudge is one of the moons. It appears like that because I haven't perfectly polar aligned the scope. That was a quick test only and I was not after super great images that night. :grin:

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Hi All. Does anyone know then, any of the settings , ISO, F Stop and exposure length, we should be attempting to use while snapping the big gas one !! I've had a look thru the primers and numerous posts but no joy. I'm using a DSLR on a t mount. Hopefully one of you imaging experts can give us "muppets", I mean me, a leg up !! Thx John :)

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