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Jayla

Best method to clean eyepieces/barlows?

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I've noticed that when I look through particular eyepieces its like looking through a microscope back in biology class, there are little "worm" type things (best way of describing it sorry!). I'm assuming this is because there is dirt etc on the glass?

How is it best to clean these? They are too small to wipe with any kind of cloth so is it good to use cotton buds?

Note to self : stuffing eyepieces in pocket whilst switching is probably not so smart...

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I do drop my eps in my pocket sometimes, especially in winter, when it is very, very cold.

Here's what Al Nagler told me about cleaning eps. (Yes, that Al Nagler.) Brush or blow loose stuff off the glass. Take a cotton bud dipped in acetone, and swirl it around the glass, and let it dry. Then breathe on the glass and wipe with a dry cotton bud. Easy.

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I'm convinced I have removed some coating from my Pentax XF ep using a cotton bud and wonderfluid

There are two possible contributing factors :

1) was it entirely cotton "cotton" bud or a mixture with a man made material? I don't know, but I will definitely look more closely on the box next time I attempt this.

2) I might have been a bit over zealous.

So be very gentle when cleaning and make sure the buds you are using are pure cotton.

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The Wonderfluid is great stuff. I use it for eyepieces and for the corrector plate on my C6. Works really well, I use the cloth and wash it carefully every so often.

Jordan

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Be wary of Acetone if there are any plastic parts present, it works well on glass but will attack chemically many plastics.

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Worm things?

Before you go cleaning, are you sure it's not dust/dead cells in your eye? Just a thought!

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If the eyepiece is big enough, try a lens pen.

I was amazed how effective these overpriced little things are.

Well worth the money..

(oh hang on... I guess that means it's not overpriced?? Hmmmm..........)

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I have no idea, what are floaters made up of..dead skin cells, fluid?

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Can anything be done about that?

(it is a problem I have)

I don't think so , I have them and my optician said they vary in quantity , sometimes I see more in my vision and sometimes less , but personally I find if I keep myself well hydrated I seem to be able to see less of them. I think drinking lots of water actually improves my eyesight slightly as I can read small print clearer when I am well hydrated. This may help.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Floaters

Vlebo

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In years gone by we used to clean lenses with pure Alcohol, and before anybody asks we did not drink the leftovers, this was also used to clean photographic bits and pieces. With to-days modern coatings I am wondering if this is still a safe practice, not sure whether it also attacks plastic.

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Guys,

follow Al Nagler's instructions!

I've been using TV plossl's, naglers and barlows since the 1980's and they are optically just as good now as they were then. Clean infrequently; but follow Al Nagler's instructions.

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Guys,

follow Al Nagler's instructions!

I've been using TV plossl's, naglers and barlows since the 1980's and they are optically just as good now as they were then. Clean infrequently; but follow Al Nagler's instructions.

Hi Merlin66 , is there a link to that piece ?

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if anyone interested :) info on floaters

Floaters are small pieces of debris that ‘float’ in the vitreous humour of the eye. They occur behind the lens (the transparent window through which light enters the eye), and in front of the retina (the light sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye).

Vitreous humour is a clear, jelly-like substance that fills the space in the middle of the eyeball. It is 99% water and 1% substances that help to maintain the shape of the vitreous.

What do floaters look like?

Floaters appear in the front of the eye, and can occur in a number of different shapes and sizes. For example, they may appear as:

  • tiny black dots,
  • small shadowy dots,
  • larger ‘cloud-like’ spots, or
  • long, narrow strands.

Floaters occur in the vitreous jelly of the eye, which is usually clear. Floaters cast shadows on to the retina and it is the shadows that someone who has floaters is able to see.

Floaters most commonly develop as your eyes get older, as part of the natural ageing process.

Will floaters affect my vision?

Floaters are harmless and will not usually interfere with your vision. Sometimes, you may have floaters without noticing them. This is because your brain constantly adapts to changes in your vision, and learns to ignore floaters so that they do not affect your vision.

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Tele Vue Optics Article Page

From the man himself!!

BE CAREFUL! - I don't know what kind of toilet paper they have in the states, but here in the United Kingdom, I've scratched countless items over the years before I realised how much grit there is embedded in English loo paper.

So avoid "Bathroom Tissue" (and "Kitchen Roll") despite what Mr Nagler says!

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I disagree!

The non perfumed kitchen towelling is ideal. No additives and absorbent.

I don't trust tissues - they have all sorts of added stuff- probably the same for toilet papers....

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BE CAREFUL! - I don't know what kind of toilet paper they have in the states, but here in the United Kingdom, I've scratched countless items over the years before I realised how much grit there is embedded in English loo paper.

So avoid "Bathroom Tissue" (and "Kitchen Roll") despite what Mr Nagler says!

You must be buying the budget loo roll :)

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I disagree!

The non perfumed kitchen towelling is ideal.

I've scratched things with Kitchen Roll before - no question about it. Upon examination, harsh particles were embedded in it.

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BE CAREFUL! - I don't know what kind of toilet paper they have in the states, but here in the United Kingdom, I've scratched countless items over the years before I realised how much grit there is embedded in English loo paper.

So avoid "Bathroom Tissue" (and "Kitchen Roll") despite what Mr Nagler says!

American bog paper is much softer than the waxed paper they use in England. It is a little tougher than facial tissues, and therefore less likely to leave bits of itself on your lens.

I don't think it's too much to spend a few bucks on optical cleaning tissue, eh?

Oddly, that article is a more detailed version of what he told me in thirty seconds in the vendor tent.

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