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neelam

is Canon 1000d capable of capturing any deep sky object faintly?

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hi guys i have seen some DSLR pics in which the orion nebula is visible with its purplish colour.is it possbile for my Canon 1000d to capture orion nebula on clear starry night at 30 seconds exposure with a 18-55 kit lense.

if not then i am looking forward to buy a 50mm f1.8 lense.would it be help full?

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With the 18-55 the Orion Nebula will be a relatively small "blob" ... Sorry :)

Here's a rough idea from CCDCalc

[ATTACH]23926[/ATTACH]

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Are you using a tracking mount ? You may get some trailing with the lens set to 55mm with exposures of 30s. With that focal length you will get the whole of Orion in the field of view. The 50mm F1.8 lens is not bad for the money but the chromatic aberration is noticable. If you take plenty of short exposures and stack them you should be able to see the Great Orion Nebula and the Running Man Nebula making up the sword of Orion.

Regards

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Your kit lens should pick up some nice wide starfield shots of the summer milky way - especially in the Cygnus/Cassiopeia area and you may well record some emission nebulae too.

I was looking at an amazing shot last week of the North American nebula on the Sky at night forum which was taken with an unmodded 1000D. Granted though that the exposures were of ten minutes duration and the set up was guided. A few basic shots should (hopefully) start you off in this nutty hobby of ours while you decide on whether to get a lens with a greater focal length (even a 135mm lens is capable of capturing pleasing shots of larger nebulae such as the North American, the California, the Rosette, IC1396 (Elephant Trunk IRC) and IC1318 (Butterfly). However you would really have to consider having the camera modded to utilise it to its full potential.

Good luck! :)

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@psycho

bro that small blob is not bad.if i can capture that with my 18-55 lense without the three kings and the other stars of orion trailing it would be great

@beyond vision

no sir i am not using a tracking mount.it has been few months that i have started this hobby and my camera is only 3weeks old.

but i will get a more decent dslr and astro trac in 2,3 years time.

big dipper

bro i really want to modd my camera cause i have bought only for taking pic of stars at night.but i really dont know how to do it.is it easy to remove that filter which block red light comming from nebula cause i really dont want to ruin my camera so soon.

2,3 days back i took around 400 shots to make a time lapse video.i have made the video but it size is around 700mb.so i am still figuring out how to upload it.in meantime i will share with you the following pics with satellite flares and a potential Meteor

i1.jpg

i2.jpg

i3.jpg

in the following pic from the center of the pic towards the air conditioner you will see a meteor like object that is narrow from the tail and is like a fireball from the front.and the pic taken immediately before has nothing in that place and the pic taken immdediately after this pic also has nothing in that place so do u think it is a meteor?

m1-1.jpg

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neelam, like you, I had a go at some widefield with my camera. I found star trails appeared sooner than 30 seconds, more like 15 was better, though I also bodged together a cheap and flimsy barn door and that allowed me a couple of minutes, which allowed very small fuzzies of a handful of the brightest deep sky objects. I also had a go at the Orion nebula with a 30mm lens (so your 50mm should be better) and although the exposure is poor, it is slightly larger than you may expect. It was taken with a 400d which will be about the same as your 1000d. The insert is 100% crop at about 12 seconds.

3401182364_5a364fcde3.jpg?v=0

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^that is very good.i wish i could make a barnmount my self.

can u help me makeone?i have found a couple of online resources but that nail/screw thing and its diameter stuff passes over my head

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Neelam,

I have taken one of you images and cropped it a bit and removed some of the noise. You should be able to pick up a nifty fifty on the photography for sale forums.

John

post-13993-133877381598_thumb.jpg

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big dipper

bro i really want to modd my camera cause i have bought only for taking pic of stars at night.but i really dont know how to do it.is it easy to remove that filter which block red light comming from nebula cause i really dont want to ruin my camera so soon.

My sentiments exactly! I, too only bought a DSLR for use in astro imaging. Like you I would never even consider modding the camera myself for fear of breaking it beyond repair. I therefore had it done by a one-man-band 'company' which was recommended to me at the time. Sadly, though my camera came through unscathed we later had to remove the proprietor of this business from my main astro forum as we were getting an unhealthy number of complaints from members about the quality of workmanship (or lack of) and a few examples of an unacceptable 'attitude' towards customers who 'dared' to chase up their orders.

If & when you decide to get your camera modded, you'd probably be best getting it done by The Astronomiser IMO.

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i am considering abanding the idea of using the lenses for astrophotography with my DSLR and simply popping it into the main focus of my telescope.

That should in theory work better?

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AT,

If you're polar aligned then yes you'll get a bigger image of whatever you're looking at.

You would need to increase the exposure time or stack a lot more images because of the increase in focal length. This would also be a lot less forgiving of any errors in polar alignment and focusing would be a tad more difficult.

I'm still using film to image using standard and telephoto lenses and an old Nikon camera mounted on my HEQ5 Pro (I'm a bit of a Luddite still, but I like film) and the biggest difficulty that I have is with spherical aberration when the lenses are fully open.

Best regards,

Lorna.

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Get yourself an old 35mm fully manual (focus and aperture) T-mount prime between 300mm and 500mm and you'll have a very useful addition to your existing scopes ... these lenses were designed to illuminate 35mm film so have no probs with APS-C sized sensors and you using the best "central" part of the lens... be very handy for M31, M42 later int he year and if you stick to the lower end of that focal lenght range will fit all the NAN and Pelican in the FOV and IC1396 as well...

Peter...

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