Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_4.gif.6a323659519d12fc7cafc409440c9dbf.gif

Comet News


FLO
 Share

Recommended Posts

So many comets, so little time! Astronomers are now monitoring almost 40 fragments of dying comet 73P/Schwassmann Wachmann 3. Of special interest is fragment B, which has just split in two. Using the online Faulkes telescope, Nick James took this picture of the double fragment on April 22nd:

image.jpg

Fragment B is glowing like a 9th magnitude star, making it an easy target for backyard telescopes. Look for it in the constellation Corona Borealis an hour or so after sunset: sky map. The view will only improve in the weeks ahead as 73P approaches Earth for a close encounter in mid-May.

Source: http://www.spaceweather.com/

Link to comment
Share on other sites

EXCUSE ME!!!!

Look at the background! All his stars are double!

I did the same trick with not being able to Registax things, but I owned up later.

Captain Chaos

Go to the top of the class Capt.

well spotted, just shows you have to be extremely careful before you shout to loud.:D

naz :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lets see if I can't make amends with this post:

Crumbling Comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 Approaches

image.jpg

A crumbling comet will soon pass near the Earth. Comet 73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3 is brightening and may even be visible to the unaided eye when the fragmented comet zooms past Earth during the middle of next month. Still, the small comet poses no Earth hazard, since it will pass the Earth at about 25 times the distance of the Moon. Exactly how bright Comet Schwassman-Wachmann 3 will get is unknown. It is even possible, althought unlikely, that debris from the comet will have spread out enough to cause a notable meteor shower. Pictured above, Fragment B of Comet Schwassman-Wachmann 3 was photographed two nights ago by a 8.2-metre Very Large Telescope in Chile. Visible to the lower right of the large B fragment are many mini-comets that have broken off and now orbit the Sun separately. Each mini-comet itself sheds gas and dust and so appears to have its own hazy coma. The comet will pass closest to the Sun on June 7.

http://tinyurl.com/hwtpb

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Heres more:

Only a few days ago, fragment B of dying comet 73P/Schwassmann Wachmann 3 split in two. One of those two pieces is now "in outburst," almost doubling in brightness since April 23rd. These false-color images from Rolando Ligustri of Talmassons, Italy, show the pair yesterday:

image.jpg

The outburst could signal a new breakup of fragment B, which brightens as fresh veins of ice and dust are exposed to sunlight. If so, the pair may soon be a triple--or more.

Fragment B is shining like a 9th magnitude star, which makes it an easy target for backyard telescopes. Look for it in the constellation Corona Borealis an hour or so after sunset. The view will only improve in the weeks ahead as 73P approaches Earth for a close encounter in mid-May

Source: www.spaceweather.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is very close to us at the moment, at .15 AU, so perhaps it isn't going to get to the 4 or 5 mag that would make it a good naked-eye object for clear skies.

I found one comet a couple years ago in my little monocular, but couldn't find it in the scope, because my finder wasn't up to the job. Strange but true. I've acquired a better finder and more eps since then.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As in good to see in binoculars, or you need good binoculars to be able to see it?

Sorry, it was a bit ambiguous.

Given a dark sky, a good 50mm binocular will take you to around mag +10.

The comet is currently around mag +9 so it is a good target for good binocular/seeing conditions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.