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Green Lazer Light?


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Ok, I've been reading lists or useful/rrecommended things to buy and some lists say to get a green laser light. 2 questions

1) What use does this have?

2) And why does the laser light have to be green?

Thanks in advance :icon_rolleyes:

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Ok, I've been reading lists or useful/rrecommended things to buy and some lists say to get a green laser light.

Strongly recommend you DON'T get one. On principle, I don't think astronomers can ask other people not to pollute the sky if we're shining lights into it. Yes I know the effect is minimal to zero, but it's hard to explain this to the public at large - especially developers who want to add laser beams to advertise their buildings.

There is also evidence that GLPs attract police, perhaps not surprisingly as eejits are actively targeting aircraft with them.

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Apart from Astronomers who are imaging, these GLL are great for locating objects in the sky. The real problem is the people using them. They use a pure stream of light which can damage ones eyesight and as reported, mindless numb nuts aim them at aircraft and helicopters thus bringing these usefull aids to the point of banning them altogether.

So called astronomers at star party's arn't imune either, there realy are a few TWATS who point these GLL at low level not realising what damage they can do.

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yes, whilst being excellent aids and a s***load of fun, they do pose a real danger. Most lasers are of the order of 5mW-15mW. These lasers are about weak enough where accidental pointing in the eye, will be OK as the blink reflex is fast enough. Higher powers (I know folk with 50mW....) and the reflex might not be enough.

dont point at aircraft, helicopters, people driving, the obvious things people shouldnt point at. Dont point it in someones eye, it can cause permanent retinal damage.

If you dont do these things, then there is absolutely no harm in having one. They are really cool, handy etc.

Assuming you are not trying to cause anarchy, then i would recommend having one.

Plus you get some great effects in a smoke filled room.....

paul

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The problem is, the more you tell an Idiot not to this or that, the chances are it falls on deaf ears. There have been enough serious incidents to warrant a complete ban on these dangerous toys, so perhaps it's time they were. I liken them to Ar******s who use mobile phones whilst driving. Do they desist, of course they don't, they're too blumming stupid. Until they kill someone that is.

Unfortunately contriteness and apologies can't resurrect the dead.

Ron.

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Well hopefully the idiots will finally face the full power of the law (oops, sorry, dreaming there for a moment).

The use of laser pens for shining at aircraft and in particular police helicopters is on the increase such that the police helicopters are now trialing kit to detect and then analyse the wavelength of the strikes, such that when the users are caught the laser wavelength can be matched to the pen - same as matching the bullet to the gun.

BBC NEWS | Technology | Police fight back on laser threat

Sadly the idiots now not content with aircraft are now moving on to trains and cars from bridges. I guess it will not be long before people are killed due to this misuse and a ban will follow.

Andy

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As an educational aid, I think they're great. I was out last night, showing a group of lads this and that in the sky, and it's so much easier if you can point to what you are talking about.

Plus, they look cool.

And are we really going to ban EVERYTHING that can pose danger if used improperly? Don't be silly.

-eli

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yes, whilst being excellent aids and a s***load of fun, they do pose a real danger. Most lasers are of the order of 5mW-15mW. These lasers are about weak enough where accidental pointing in the eye, will be OK as the blink reflex is fast enough. Higher powers (I know folk with 50mW....) and the reflex might not be enough.

I think you need to do a little more research here... HS regs state that anything above *1mW* should not be used in public...

Arthur

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HI

I for one have used a laser, and had hours of fun. That was before i realised they were illegal, should be common sense really (my naievity)!

And as for falling on deaf ears............. it certainly hasnt with me!

darren:)

You are to be applauded for that Darren, let's hope others can see the light. Or not see it in this case.:icon_rolleyes:

Ron.;)

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HI

I for one have used a laser, and had hours of fun. That was before i realised they were illegal, should be common sense really (my naievity)!

And as for falling on deaf ears............. it certainly hasnt with me!

darren:)

They are not illegal - I bought one from Telescope House recently. But like everything that is capable of causing harm, some commonsense in application is required. I don't think they should be banned - they are a useful tool - but idiots who point them at aircraft should be castrated and go to gaol for 10 years.

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If we're going to spend our time discouraging people from shining lights in the sky (i.e. house lights, security lights etc) then I think we ought to set a good example by doing the same, whatever the wattage.

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No - they are not *Illegal*, but use one in public and you *will* be arrested. Trust me. Come on people, these things are dangerous and yes, the blink reflex (0.25 sec) will possibly save your eye *assuming the laser is pulsed* which many are not. In the right hands then yes, acceptable - how can you be sure those hands are yours though?

Arthur

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Come on guys - they are a *tool* - and like any tool, they have their place - I find one invaluable to point out objects to various people in the night sky at home. I am usually imaging at the same time as well, so make sure I don't point near my target.

Star parties - yes, 100% agree - they are not appropriate because of imagers.

Banning them - get real - like that will stop the id10ts, who'll still get them from overseas. Consider the availability of mini-FM transmitters for your iPod - those were banned in the UK until very recently under the telecommunications act - didn't stop them being sold from overseas into the UK? No.

In my view, we are better off applying common-sense.

Cheers,

Richie

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... and you can *guarantee* that there are no other people imaging in a (say) mile radius then while you are poking the sky with your toy? Only not pointing near *your* target seems a little selfish to me.

Common sense dictates you leave them at home in the cupboard - a couple of years ago this very subject left the Kelling star party pretty much a non-event until the total ban was accepted.

Arthur

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Some commonsense from Richie. Bans never work - it only makes it more attractive to the idiots. Afterall, banning drugs has been a rip-roaring success hasn't it? I can see the point of restricting use at star parties, but I use mine at public outreach nights to point out objects. I don't use it at home because I'm near the flightpath to an airport. Don't want to get arrested!

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I think you are overestimating the power of a green beam Arthur.

Another imager would have to be pretty close to my location to be affected. The beam is hand-held, so it will not be held constant on a tight enough section of the sky to cause other imagers any problems. They are more likely to loose a sub due to an aircraft or satellite than a laser.

The problem with star parties is that there is a concentration of astronomers in a small area, and multiple beams will cause problems for imagers.

The nearest imager I know of to my location is 7 miles away.

I think your being overly paranoid about the effects.

Richie

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I have a few comments...

1. They are legal in the UK for leisurly use up to 5mw

2. To damage the eye, you would have to literally stare at the direct beam of a 5mw for several seconds without blinking. The sheer brightness would make this quite uncomfortable to do so. (It will however cause temporary reduction in sight which eventually rights itself after several minutes).

I feel that the minute green lasers are bought as a *toy* for *fun*, thats when things get dangerous. I use mine solely as a tool for pointing out objects to people. For this job they are fantastic. I can find no other method that does the job so well to a group of people that are not standing right next to you. As a side note, I agree that they should be banned at the more serious star parties where imaging is going on or when everyone is looking at different parts of the sky... very distracting.

Matt

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