Jump to content

Banner.jpg.692da9ed9af2eace53e1dc94cfc0e912.jpg

A bit of a reward...


Recommended Posts

21 hours ago, Ags said:

Your argument is based on Euclidean geometry which Flat Earthers have long since disproved.

Careful.. anything "disproved" by flat earthers might actually be real...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 07/07/2022 at 21:09, Paul M said:

And very deserving it is too! I think Globs are, overall, my favorite DSO's. Mesmerising to look at, and mind boggling to think about.

Lots of pretty GCs to image.

I urge you to image difficult ones. Much more a sense of achievement, in my view. Try starting with a Mayall 2.  It's quite bright, easy to find and big enough not to appear stellar as long as you use a high enough magnification. It is M31's equivalent of our ω Centauri. Should be visible to someone looking through a 20cm scope and a decent but unexceptional sky, and easily within the range of a 60mm refractor and camera.

After that, pick up hundreds of GCs in M31 and M33; dozens in M81 and who knows how many in the Virgo cluster. M87 alone has over 12 thousand GCs known, hundreds of which are accessible to amateur imagers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice!

Thought about trying for other GCs in the Local Group, or even further afield?

I can point you at some of my images if you wish.

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, Paul M said:

Ahhh! :)   look at the end of this post!

Just a thought: have you located stars of very similar brightness to the GC in your image and compared their appearance with Mayall II? Aladin-Lite will likely let you do that.

If other stars of that magnitude are noticeably smaller then you have shown that the GC is non-stellar.

IIRC, it is about 3 arcsec across. Within the seeing disk for most imagers but readily non-stellar for visual observers with their 100ms integration time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Xilman said:

Nice!

Thought about trying for other GCs in the Local Group, or even further afield?

I can point you at some of my images if you wish.

I always like to see other people's images so fire away!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Paul M said:

I always like to see other people's images so fire away!

Happy to do so, but in this thread?  It is just about on-topic, IMAO, given that it started with an image of a GC.

Here is an image of 50-ish globular clusters. See https://britastro.org/observations/observation.php?id=20190311_020000_9a2c47fcf9f3ee97 for details of the observation. Different processing of the same data revealed another dozen or so, which is also available in my BAA gallery

M81_GC.png

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

41 minutes ago, Paul M said:

Ahhh! :)   look at the end of this post!

Thought about trying for some difficult GCs in our galaxy?  Balbinot 1 is the hardest I have yet managed. I strongly recommend you start with much easier objects first, such as the Palomar GCs.

https://britastro.org/section_information_/deep-sky-section-overview/observing-programmes/globular-clusters/the-gc-marathons-part-i-galactic-globular-clusters

might get you started.

One day, if and when some round tuits become available, I will issue a first cut at the second article in the series.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.