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Bresser Messier 152/1200


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Has anybody here got experience with the Bresser Messier 152/1200 (f8) refractor? If so, would you recommend it. It seems a good price for a large refractor (even an achromat). 

I'd primarily be an observer of the planets and the Moon, so I'm attracted to the aperture and the moderately high focal ratio. I understand these wide aperture refractors can have some issues with CA. 

Bresser also offers the scope on a computerised, equatorial mount, so it seems ideal for photography. 

I have also been looking at Dobs, but I want an eq mount so I can use the scope for short exposure shots. Furthermore, I am a bit intimidated by the need to collimate and maintain a reflector. 

My budget is up to about 1500 euro. Will this telescope at f/8 and say at x300 (under good seeing conditions), show Juputer, Saturn and Mars at a good apparent size in the eyepiece?

Any advice or info would be greatly appreciated.

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I had a Skywatcher Evostar150 f/8 refractor and it was superb for low power rich field viewing. Quite good for lunar/planets but the CA kicks in at higher magnifications and the image becomes soft. Imo, a 4" ED refractor would be better suited really. 

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Posted (edited)
3 hours ago, Franklin said:

I had a Skywatcher Evostar150 f/8 refractor and it was superb for low power rich field viewing. Quite good for lunar/planets but the CA kicks in at higher magnifications and the image becomes soft. Imo, a 4" ED refractor would be better suited really. 

Thank you for your reply, Franklin.

I would actually prefer to go for an ED, but cost is a significant factor. I'm seeing 4" EDs for about €1600, but that is before the cost of the mount is added. I've no doubt they are more than worth the money, but for my budget I think I'd be best buy the scope and mount as a package. I might look at the Evostar 120 or 150 ed and perhaps save up for a mount at another time. That said, if the CA isn't ruinous, I'd tolerate it. 

On your Evostar 150 were the planets tiny points of light? Or could you discern details on the surface, etc. With seeing conditions here in Ireland, I think even x300 would be pushing it. I have had some people recommend large dobs. However, I would prefer an equatorial mount for tracking and also, I have read that refractors perform more reliably in poor seeing conditions. 

Edited by Antoinfletcher
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I have an Evostar 120/1000 on an EQ5 pro go to mount and used in conjunction with the Baader semi apo filter the CA is reduced considerably. The planets are easily within reach at this focal length and even more so if a 2 or 3X Barlow is used in the imaging train. 

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Someone will be along who knows more, but have you considered a mak?  You can get one on a fairly small mount and they apparently give amazing views of the planets.  It will give a higher focal length and as large an aperture.

You could get the skywatcher 150mak with either the eq5 or the heq5 for a very similar price to the bresser.

You can fire up stellarium and see what the planets will look like through various combinations of eyepieces and Barlow's.

If imaging is something you are thinking about I would have a look at astrobin.com and search for the scope to see what other people are getting our of the ota's.  I could be wrong but, if you are doing planetary then you don't really need tracking as people generally do short exposures compared to deep sky and basically stack from a video.

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I used to have an Evostar 150 achro. It was very good on the moon and planets, but there was noticeable CA at higher mags and on brighter objects. As said, you could buy a semi apo filter which will help, depends if you can "see through" the CA. It wasn't a deal breaker for me and enjoyed it very much. A Mak or CC would be another good shout. 

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In practice it is rare to reach even x200 on the planets with any instrument except in rare conditions.

But x200 is plenty magnification to see detail: belts and barges on Jupiter, markings on Mars, the Cassini division on Saturn.

Easy calculation: Jupiter is 40'' in angular size. Times 200 gives 133' or more than two degrees apparent size in the EP, so it will look like the width of two of your fingers at arms length, big enough to see detail. 

At 150mm F8 the Bresser is a beast though: a heavy scope to move about and as other say as well it will need some CA control at high mags.  You will be better off with a Cassegrain of some sort. 

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Many years ago I had a skywatcher 150mm F/8 achromat refractor and found it to be very good at low powers for deep sky objects.

It was OK on the Moon at x100 but did show some Chromatic aberration.

At x190 to x200 for the planets it showed strong colour smearing and the image started to get soft, a CA filter helped a little but a light yellow filter was better and cheaper but the yellow cast was off-putting.

It was a beast to mount - a Vixen GPDX was not enough so ideally an EQ6 may be needed for high powers.

It was beaten in all areas by my equatorially mounted Skywatcher 8” F/6 Newtonian - with Apochromatic views.

Perhaps a modern alternative could be the GSO 8” Classical Cassegrain.

 

Edited by dweller25
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  • 3 weeks later...

TS-Optics 6" f/5.9 Refractor could be an alternative as RFT to the Bresser but i don't think that any of them are for  Planets and Moon

I have a Mak 127 and a faster achro- 120/600, but there is no comparison between the Mak and achro on Moon, Mak is blowing away the refractor

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