Jump to content

2052839955_Mobilephonebanner.jpg.a502a319d7033354d442937f2edd0c2c.jpg

First time to the Southern Hemisphere: what goes on the list?


Recommended Posts

I have planned a trip to Namibia in a couple of weeks. I will be observing with a 12" and a 16" dobsonian, and will take pictures with a 102mm apo. 

I think I'll feel like a kid in a candystore, with so many new objects and excellent skies to look at them... But I feel overwhelmed. Should I look at new objects only? Should I redo objects that I only saw on the horizon from other places? ... 

 

What objects should definately go on my list? (visual or photographic)

Any other experiences that might help overcome the delirium are more than welcome... 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it were me, I would take the opportunity that pristine skies would offer to get improved images of targets I'd already seen. Might as well make the most of them while you can, right? I'd put new objects at the back of the queue personally 🤷

Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 for the above.

A member of my local astro. society/club has been to Namibia🇳🇦 a few times and highly recommends it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would look at new objects visually first as if you missed the opportunity you wouldn't see them on your return.  By all means take some images of your choice if there is time, you can always take better ones from home by renting time on professional class instruments sited in the S. Hemisphere.    🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having been South a few times I would strongly recommend taking in the unique big sights such as LMC, SMC, Coalsack, Southern Milky Way and so many others. You can even do a lot of this with binoculars whilst imaging? It would be a shame to miss the big picture.

Better prepare a good shortlist!

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Forget the imaging. Spend time using your naked eyes, binoculars and those lovely dobs. You will end up with wonderful memories of how impressive the southern sky is, not a pile of images of objects that have been imaged 10,001 times before.

  • Like 6
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it were me l would try to image targets unreachable from the UK.  
 

targets that immediately spring  to mind are: 

Statue of Liberty nebula, Tarantula Nebula, Vela, carina nebula, dragons if Ara.  Running Chicken.  Also a decent Antares Region.  
Not having studied the seasons in the southern hemisphere not sure if all these will be up.  

Carole

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

54 minutes ago, JeremyS said:

Forget the imaging. Spend time using your naked eyes, binoculars and those lovely dobs. You will end up with wonderful memories of how impressive the southern sky is, not a pile of images of objects that have been imaged 10,001 times before.

I would agree with this. Don't waste any time not looking up :) I have been to Namibia once (and would love to go again) and the skies in the Namib desert are simply spellbinding! So many stars and colours, I spent evenings just marvelling with my eyes and a pair of small binoculars. Admittedly I did not have a telescope with me. Whatever you do I'm sure it'll be fantastic!

Malcolm

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the input everyone! 

As for imaging: the setup will be ready for me and I will bring my asiair, so I can easily program it and won't have to look back. I chose a widefield apo (and not one of their bigger setups), exactly to be on the safe side and spend all of my time sketching and observing :)  That's what I always do, and it doesn't really cut into the observing time. I'm also bringing a skytracker for real wide field imaging of the milky way, that one does need some attention though. 

On top of my list is the Rho Ophiuchii region, which will get at least 2 nights worth of imaging time. The Magellanic clouds are not placed very well right now; Sagittarius will be straight up. 

I was thinking of some dark nebulae (Chameleon looks like it has a decent amount of them), Omega centauri ofcourse, and Centaurus A, but I can still use some ideas :) 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You won’t have the right imaging set up for it, but if I’m ever fortunate to have the opportunity I would want to image NGC 1365 in Fornax, for me the most photogenic galaxy in the heavens, North and South.

Enjoy your stay under Southern skies.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Quote

Forget the imaging. Spend time using your naked eyes, binoculars and those lovely dobs. You will end up with wonderful memories of how impressive the southern sky is, not a pile of images of objects that have been imaged 10,001 times before.

I would agree with this. Don't waste any time not looking up 

There is plenty of time to "look up" once the imaging is up and running, which can take hours of imaging time.  Why sacrifice one for the other when you can do both.  Of course you can't look through the eyepiece that has a camera stuck in it.   But you are recommending binoculars anyway.  

Carole 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As Carole says, once you have the subs rolling in there's plenty of time for visual, it's what I do even under my only so-so dark skies.

Don't waste precious imaging time.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, tomato said:

You won’t have the right imaging set up for it, but if I’m ever fortunate to have the opportunity I would want to image NGC 1365 in Fornax, for me the most photogenic galaxy in the heavens, North and South.

Enjoy your stay under Southern skies.

It would be worth the try, even with this setup (I did choose this one over a smaller field of view, just for the ease, but it still is somewhere in between my home rigs, the Esprit 80 and 120) but unfortunately it is the wrong season for it. 

 

 

I think I have made a quite decent list, not too large either, so I can get enough integration time on the targets. I will add some comets "on the go" and maybe some objects that look stunning in the telescope. 

 

Here's the first draft: 

NGC 6723 a globular cluster with surrounding bright and dark nebula - should be interesting. (picture for reference)

 focused_201499328-stock-photo-dark-nebul

NGC 2997 https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:HAWK-I_NGC_2997.jpg

NGC 4945  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Phot-18a-99-hires.jpg

NGC 5139 - Omega Centauri 

NGC 5128 - Centaurus A

IC 2944 - Lambda Centauri Cluster

IC 4604 - Rho Ophiuchi Nebula

NGC 253 - Sculptor Galaxy

NGC 3372 - Eta Carina

NGC 3576 - Statue of liberty nebula

NGC 6188 - Fighting Dragons of Ara

 

 

 

Thank you all for the inspiration!! 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You'll love it, southern sky has some wonderful objects. Spent 30 years down under and do miss the skies. Eta Carinae is one of my favourites. The main nebula is amazing but pay particular attention to the star at high mag. The two gas jets coming off are amazing, unlike anything else I've seen. Will be awesome in a big scope :)

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.