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50 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

As topless Cleopatra's oarsmen rowed, I took my repose across the lake. (Can I say that on here? If not, she can be wearing a Barbour jacket if the mods insist...)

Olly

Ohhhhh matron!!!!

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54 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

Can I say that on here? If not, she can be wearing a Barbour jacket if the mods insist...

Why would she need to? Clearly, it is the oarsmen who are topless. Or should that be "bare chested"?

I have working knowledge of a few languages, and find the english language most suited for word play. (According to a former colleague, French is better for swearing.)

A bit of plural trivia:

as was already noted in this thread, the plural of 'datum' is 'data'. This is also so in Swedish. But, in Swedish, the plural of a noun ending in -a, is formed by replacing the '-a' with '-or'. So the plural of 'data' would be 'dator'. Which is the singular form of the Swedish word for 'computer'. The plural of which is 'datorer'.

"Savvy?"

Edited by wimvb
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Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, wimvb said:

Why would she need to? Clearly, it is the oarsmen who are topless. Or should that be "bare chested"?

I have working knowledge of a few languages, and find the english language most suited for word play. (According to a former colleague, French is better for swearing.)

A bit of plural trivia:

as was already noted in this thread, the plural of 'datum' is 'data'. This is also so in Swedish. But, in Swedish, the plural of a noun ending in -a, is formed by replacing the '-a' with '-or'. So the plural of 'data' would be 'dator'. Which is the singular form of the Swedish word for 'computer'. The plural of which is 'datorer'.

"Savvy?"

Perhaps English is good for wordplay because of its enormous vocabulary, estimated at being three to six times larger than French, for instance. (It depends rather on what is to be counted as a word, English lexicographers being more lax than French ones. That's to say that they are... ahem... laxicographers...)

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
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4 hours ago, ollypenrice said:

Perhaps English is good for wordplay because of its enormous vocabulary, estimated at being three to six times larger than French, for instance. (It depends rather on what is to be counted as a word, English lexicographers being more lax than French ones. That's to say that they are... ahem... laxicographers...)

Olly

The words spoken could have been 'rows across the lake' or 'rose across the lake'  - it was 19 to 1 on being rows (as in rowing) and I was the odd one. The 19 others said there could only be that spelling and challeged me to find another. I said 'the plane took off and rose across the lake as it gathered speed' and ' autumn leaves on the surface seemed to join up in rows across the lake'

I guess that I was on the course as I had just been promoted up and had to go through several training courses, the other more senior management probably were just stubborn & fixed in their views and needing re-training.😉

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39 minutes ago, StevieDvd said:

The words spoken could have been 'rows across the lake' or 'rose across the lake'  - it was 19 to 1 on being rows (as in rowing) and I was the odd one. The 19 others said there could only be that spelling and challeged me to find another. I said 'the plane took off and rose across the lake as it gathered speed' and ' autumn leaves on the surface seemed to join up in rows across the lake'

I guess that I was on the course as I had just been promoted up and had to go through several training courses, the other more senior management probably were just stubborn & fixed in their views and needing re-training.😉

My first thought was, 'The sun rose across the lake,' but I wanted to find something more quirky. Funnily enough, 'rows' across the lake didn't come to me quickly despite the fact that it is perfectly normal to row on a lake.

Olly

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Posted (edited)
19 hours ago, StevieDvd said:

 

One example was to make up a sentence using the words "xxxx across the lake" where xxxx was a word rhyming with nose but beginning with an 'r' instead of 'n' (obviously he spoke this hence my use of the xxxx). Everone but me was convinced it could only be the one word meaning/spelling.

Due to the wide variety of fish species, at spawning time there was a mix of roes across the lake 

Similarly

The boatman refused to take the fallow deer, but was happy to take the roes across the lake 

Alternatively

After the explosion in the Greek letter factory there was a scattering of rhos across the lake

I think I saw that 'rose' has the most homophones of any word

🙂 people on this forum are wise, others are idiots

Edited by Gfamily
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2 hours ago, Gfamily said:

Due to the wide variety of fish species, at spawning time there was a mix of roes across the lake 

Similarly

The boatman refused to take the fallow deer, but was happy to take the roes across the lake 

Alternatively

After the explosion in the Greek letter factory there was a scattering of rhos across the lake

I think I saw that 'rose' has the most homophones of any word

🙂 people on this forum are wise, others are idiots

Excellent!  However, might there be a wisp of doubt concerning roes and rows (or rose) as homophones? Rose and rows, yes, but does the 'o' in roes not hover for a moment, making it a slightly longer vowel? Perhaps not, because our reading ear is not quite the same as our aural one. My father, a Yorkshireman, could never consider weight and wait as homophones. The former was pronounced way-eet while the long a sound in wait was pronounced as in the word air.

Olly

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10 minutes ago, ollypenrice said:

Excellent!  However, might there be a wisp of doubt concerning roes and rows (or rose) as homophones? Rose and rows, yes, but does the 'o' in roes not hover for a moment, making it a slightly longer vowel? Perhaps not, because our reading ear is not quite the same as our aural one. My father, a Yorkshireman, could never consider weight and wait as homophones. The former was pronounced way-eet while the long a sound in wait was pronounced as in the word air.

Olly

Well, at least any disagreements about homophones won't result in rows. 

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25 minutes ago, Gfamily said:

Well, at least any disagreements about homophones won't result in rows. 

No, you can disagree about homphones on dry land, well away from boats...

:Dlly

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