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Filters for camera lenses please


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I have a MFT camera and an assortment of filters for it. I mainly use my ND filters for video work during the day, but a filter that greatly reduces light isn't a good idea for night time photography.

 

What useful circular "screw on" filters would be a good for simple subjects like the moon, landscapes or time lapses of the stars?

I have a 1/4 Pro Mist filter for video work and it does a very good job at enhancing sunset videos by giving the sun an extra glow and pleasing colour vibrancy. Probably not so great for pin point stars.

Edited by the lemming
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On 09/01/2022 at 23:36, the lemming said:

I have a MFT camera and an assortment of filters for it. I mainly use my ND filters for video work during the day, but a filter that greatly reduces light isn't a good idea for night time photography.

 

What useful circular "screw on" filters would be a good for simple subjects like the moon, landscapes or time lapses of the stars?

I have a 1/4 Pro Mist filter for video work and it does a very good job at enhancing sunset videos by giving the sun an extra glow and pleasing colour vibrancy. Probably not so great for pin point stars.

SLT have a range of Clip-In filters for Olympus and Panasonic. I.E. have filter and prime mount on OTA. They are not the same fitment. I use Astro-Multispectra to reduce town lights. Depends on your Bortal.

You can get the astro filters screw on but as they are expensive it makes no sense if you ever consider mounting the camera onto a telescope,

An ND makes sense for moon photos. You can get clip-in ND and coloured filters too. It is very bright and we want a DoF of 1,700km, so we want a smaller aperture. However MFT tend to do better wider than f/13 - f/16 and f/22 tend to produce aberrations. You can get around things but spot metering highlight on the moon and superimposing a nighttime foreground metered there on long exposure (moon blown out).

Lance Keimig  "Night Photography ..." ISBN 978-0-415-71898-1

The Auto-WB and exposure metering goes to pot with the moon.  The metering tries to adjust to 18% grey but the moon is not grey, and the sky is not black.  Much of it is grey but also sandy-gold. If you let these cameras do their own thing you can get a daylight blue sky at night.

I do still use polarising and Wratten 85, The latter more to take the sting out of flash and warm it up. I used an 81A "cloudy" to warm sunsets on film,  The 82A "Morning and Evening" is bluish and does the opposite. The AWB may knock the WB back to midday sun temperature. The colours can be pushed about in the Lumix Photostyles, but not like the PEN-F where every colour can be adjusted to emulate film stock, or such that never existed. I've got ND, never had much use for them. I've played with coloured grads, a bit meh. Nota, the Wratten 85 is a proper film conversion not a typical Orange 85 but more subtle; 85B is bright orange, 85C is "Dawn & Dusk" but the 81/82 series are light balancing, amber 81A provides subtle warming. Coloured filters were more for film but digital can usually push the colours about by fiddling the WB or Photostyle.

Edited by jefrs
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