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The oldest person you know who still observes?


F15Rules
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Just thinking out loud...

It occurred to me that I don't know personally know any  really elderly observers, but I do seem to recall that Sir Patrick Moore, RIP was still observing in his 80s?

I'd be interested to hear about enthusiasts who have been able to keep active to this kind of age?

I'm 65 myself, and I know my eyes aren't as good as they were 6 or 7 years ago, but I'm also more aware of my mortality, and I feel the cold more than I did, for example.

The thing is, though, I still love "looking up" as much as ever, and I'd like to hope that I could be able to regularly observe for another 10 years though, subject to continued good health and mobility allowing 😊..

What are your thoughts on this New Year's eve?

Dave

 

 

Edited by F15Rules
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I am 66 and dont like the cold so moved to imaging but even that is a pain sometimes so looking forward will probably go for something along the lines of the Stellina smart scope in the future..or my smartphone.

Just a note that when I say imaging its either a hand held Lunar shots with my Canon gear or a static tripod with a wide angle lens with my 80D which can be fully controlled indoors over wifi.

Alan

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4 minutes ago, ScouseSpaceCadet said:

There's quite a few older folks in the local astro society. I'm sure SGL's own Peter Drew had his 105th birthday recently?!

Heres to your continued good health Dave. May you drop dead at eyepiece at a ripe old age!

Happy New Year. 🤳

Thanks for the good wishes..😊

And I'm sure Peter's immune to ageing as the rest of us know it!

Dave

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I had a good friend who, although he tended to be more interested in telescopes than observing, retained his enthusiasm until he popped his clogs at age 81. But he would still observe with me in my observatory whenever it was clear, right till the end.  Then I have another  friend and observing buddy, paulastro, who although not quite as old as Methuselah, is so enthusiastic its painful. I feel certain he'll be the sort of observer who'll die at the eyepiece.  In fact I think he almost did on one occasion  after falling asleep while observing in seriously sub zero temperatures. 

 

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Thank you Dave I am 74 and I am hoping to carry on a bit longer. I still play squash 3 times per week usually for an hour at a time so I believe I am quite fit.  I am still thinking of getting a 4" Apo  so I hope I live long enough to. enjoy it.

Best wishes everyone for a healthy 2022.

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Into my 73rd year and the biggest disincentive is the cold and damp.  I think once you develop an interest in astronomy, it lasts forever.  I'm more likely to die at the computer screen than the eyepiece though.

Mike

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Just a pup at 63 here. My only issues are stiff joints and a bad back. Sometimes manoeuvring myself into position can be quite traumatic :unsure:

I think sometimes when I get up off the floor a crane would be handy :biggrin:

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There is the alternative way of looking at it that astronomy helps keep the little grey cells working in older age. An hour spent fiddling with software, hardware and a stack of books should certainly keep you younger.

So, something to take up in older age!

Chris

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Well i'm 50 this year & feel old 😂 I do my best to keep in shape though. I live in Cumbria so i'm very active in the outdoors with hiking, mountain biking, climbing & fell running (well, I say running but its more like pretty fast walking these days 😬) I still have a lot more aches & pains than I did 20yrs ago.
I hope i've a fair few years left at the eyepiece although that should really be 'at the tablet' as all I do is image nowadays & dont even own an eyepiece now.

Edited by nephilim
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4 hours ago, Mr Spock said:

Just a pup at 63 here. My only issues are stiff joints and a bad back. Sometimes manoeuvring myself into position can be quite traumatic :unsure:

I think sometimes when I get up off the floor a crane would be handy :biggrin:

You know Michael this new 4" APO you bought is going to keep you young and active. Next time we meet I look forward to seeing this new scope in action.

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14 minutes ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

Next time we meet I look forward to seeing this new scope in action.

I'll be bringing it to the next Star Party (whenever that is).

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16 hours ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

Thank you Dave I am 74 and I am hoping to carry on a bit longer. I still play squash 3 times per week usually for an hour at a time so I believe I am quite fit.  I am still thinking of getting a 4" Apo  so I hope I live long enough to. enjoy it.

Best wishes everyone for a healthy 2022.

Happy New Year Mark😊👍.

Great post and a great attitude!

I do have a friend in our village who is incredibly active at the age of 78..he's a retired RAF squadron commander and spent almost 30 years in the military. He met his wife in service, but she was/is 25 years younger than he, and even now they do daily walks in winter of 3 hours (bike rides in summer). That's the military life for you I guess.

My wife and I walk most days, rarely more than 3-4 miles, but it is worthwhile and we feel a bit 'hemmed in" if we don't have a walk.

Im also active in the garden during spring and summer in particular, and I still go up my ladder regularly to clean windows..much to my wife's annoyance!😂

Dave

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Nice reply Dave. I have been playing squash for about 48 years and have played many matches against the RAF and SAS both having good facilities at their camps. I used to play the Commanding Officer at RAF Credenhill and having too many drinks in the officers mess.

Be careful with the ladder my neighbour decided to clean his gutters and fell off the ladder and was killed so perhaps your Wife is being sensible.

Just came in from an hour plus viewing the Sun in WL and Ha.

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19 minutes ago, Mark at Beaufort said:

Just came in from an hour plus viewing the Sun in WL and Ha.

What is The Sun, Mark?? 

Is it something I should know about? I know all about The Grey, The Mist and The Fog..oh, and The Flu..but The Sun🤔??.. you've got me there...!!😂😂

BTW, I am very careful on ladders...my wife knew someone years ago, a locally well known medical consultant..

He fell off a 3 step step ladder at home and broke his neck, dead!🥴..

..a salutary reminder to be ultra careful on ladders..beginning with stout footwear with non slip soles!

Dave

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75, not out. Still building telescopes, mountings and observatories.
I have a 4.3m [14'] GRP dome nearing completion in my usual parking spot.
Almost ready to be lifted up onto my second floor, solo-self-built observatory.

You can't imagine how much has changed since I built my first telescope at 14.
From 60mm 1/2 diopter spectacle lens back in the 1950s. Simple, single eye lenses.
I still have them in plastic tubs of stuff collected over a lifetime.

No more Exchange & Mart and long out-of-date books in the library.
The annual request, by post, for never-changing, printed catalogues.
They might as well have been selling Lambos rather than telescopes.
I made my own mirrors. lenses, mountings and telescopes.
Simply because I couldn't afford commercial offerings.

The Internet changed literally everything, but slowly at first.
Abusenet, serial bullying and trolling by text only.
Some real experts and probably some pros. NO moderation!

Then Yahoo Groups serial posting. No parallel threading.

SGL is a pleasant change from everything which went before.
Friendly, with excellent image handling.
It is still magical to be able to post seconds after capturing and processing a live image.
Wide range of expertise. Tolerant of newbies. Enthusiastic atmosphere. Fun!
I admire the subtle moderation here. Very unlike CN!

Imaging the sun has become my main passion in the last few years.
Much more fun than sitting in the cold and dark:
Though I was imaging the sun at -6C the other day. Never learn!
I am hugely lucky to remain fit enough to continue my lifetime obsession.
 

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26 minutes ago, StarryEyed said:

I didnt know anyone older than me who still observed. But now I can say and with the exception of nephilim everyone else who replied to this thread! 

Keep it up. Your all an inspiration. 

@StarryEyed Thats very ageist of you 🤣

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