Jump to content

1912116577_Solarchallenge2022banner.jpg.913a200cf105ddeae9f37765cb1d0c73.jpg

Carbon & Other Red Stars


Recommended Posts

I was just wondering if anyone out there is observing red stars? Not because of their variability but simply because of the colour.

At the moment μ Cephei is well placed for northern observers. I might give it a look the next time I'm out.

I'll also see if I can find a list somewhere - unless someone already has one?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love carbon stars - I really must have a proper carbon star evening. That list looks good, although I do have a list in Sky Safari from somewhere. I never know which is my best scope to use for coloured stars like this - I think bigger apertures like the C8 are supposed to reveal more colour, but the star shapes in the the 102ED are just so sharp and crisp. Perhaps I'll try the binoviewer and see if two eyes help with colour.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, RobertI said:

I never know which is my best scope to use for coloured stars like this - I think bigger apertures like the C8 are supposed to reveal more colour, but the star shapes in the the 102ED are just so sharp and crisp.

I've always found star colours to be more vivid in my ED80 than any of my reflectors or achros. I think it's down to a combination of tighter stars and better contrast. I'm looking forward to seeing what the 102 can do; that has more aperture and better glass.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Mr Spock said:

I've always found star colours to be more vivid in my ED80 than any of my reflectors or achros. I think it's down to a combination of tighter stars and better contrast. I'm looking forward to seeing what the 102 can do; that has more aperture and better glass.

I suspect that too much light brightens star colour towards white. The secret of your ED80 may, in part, be its small aperture. I certainly think smaller aperture helps star colour.

Olly

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

119 Tauri is the reddest and brightest carbon star I've ever seen. Looks fantastic in my 7 X 50 binocs. Also know as the Ruby star it's below the lower horn of Taurus. Not to be missed.

Edited by Davidv
Wrong number entered for star ID
  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do like a carbon star hunt sometimes! The reddest I've seen is probably R Leporis (Hind's Crimson Star) which is probably rather well known by now! Finding the right time to view it is the trick. As with a lot of carbon stars, it is variable, and looks most red when at its dimmest. If you view it under rally dark skies, the colour is really striking. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic, but what about other strong colors. I have seen strong oranges and yellows, but a good blue is really elusive. Alnitak should be the bluest of blue (being an O type star with high apparent brightness), but it just looks white to me. Maybe "cold white", but that's all.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Ags said:

Slightly off topic, but what about other strong colors. I have seen strong oranges and yellows, but a good blue is really elusive. Alnitak should be the bluest of blue (being an O type star with high apparent brightness), but it just looks white to me. Maybe "cold white", but that's all.

Yes I've always struggled with anything other than orange/yellow. The Pleiades are pretty blue I think, but still just seem white to me! 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 19/11/2021 at 17:15, DeanCJ said:

Many thanks for this, had an early evening hour of checking some of these out. SU and VX Andromedae Also SAO 109003 and Z both in Pisces. Perfect for quickies out the garden.

Z Pisces was the most vivid colour-wise. SAO 109003 was the most difficult to detect colour. The two in Andromeda had lovely star fields. Will be using this list regularly.

Cheers

Muc

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.