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NOV 19TH - LONGEST PARTIAL LUNAR ECLIPSE SINCE FEB 18TH 1440 !!


paulastro
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The forecast for this event was 98% cloudy for the duration,.  I put the alarm on for 6.20am anyway, and awoke to see the Moon through the  bedroom window low down in the West!  Dressed quickly, grabbed my 10x50s and headed outside.

I knew I couldn't see it from home due to the low altitude so headed up the road to the moors a 10 minute brisk uphill walk away.  Arrived at a vantage point at 6.46am where I could steady my 10x50s leaning on a drystone wall. The noticeably subdued full Moon was at around 5 degrees altitude  with the penumbral shadow covering just over half of the surface. The penumbral shadow was not clearly defined, but it was clear the full Moon was far less bright than it would usually be, looking wonderful in the binoculars.

By 7.20 the NE limb looked quite darker and I could clearly see the curved umbral shadow of the earth encroaching  upon the moon. It was a joy to see as the dawn progressed, the light on the landscape changing by the minute. I finally lost the Moon as it set behind the moors in the distance a mere nine minutes later at 7.29am.

I have seen numerous lunar eclipses, but I felt elated to think I had seen a part of the longest partial lunar Eclipse for over 600 years, and to know there will not be a longer one until Feb 18th 2669 !  

I  made my way home smiling with what I had seen, accompanied by a stunning dawn sky.

The phone snaps below don't do the event justice (for which I apologise), but they will always remind me of a most  memorable morning.

Also added, information from spaceweather.com

 

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2 minutes ago, Alan White said:

Nice one Paul, gald you got up and got out and have seen it.

 

Thanks Alan. In my hurry to get out, I forgot to take my walking stick I'm having to use for a spinal condition. I didn't feel a thing whilst I was observing - the pain I had when I was home was a price well worth paying 😄.

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Many thanks Mike.

Yes, I'm sorry about that.  I don't know what came over me. I don't think I've ever posted a picture of myself in a thread before - in case I get molested by hoards of admirers in the street 🙂.

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53 minutes ago, Captain Magenta said:

Lucky you! Nice pictures especially from a phone. I too got up and set up for the slim chance there'd be no clouds, alas the forecast was correct. Oh well, alarm set for Feb 2669.

Thank you, sorry you missed out.  I've already put the Feb 2669 event in my perpetual calendar 😊.

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Many thanks Mark, that's kind of you.  I'm sorry you missed it, I must admit, when the alarm went off I expected to look out of the window and then be ablego back to bed!

It would be nice to see it if your son does observe it and takes a photo.  

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We had clear, cold, and calm skies, so a beautiful view of the eclipse last night from Texas.  Only problem, it peaked at 3am local time, and I had to get up and go to work in the morning.  As a result, I set my alarm, got up, saw it looked great, woke up the wife (she had said she wanted to see it if it was clear), and we enjoyed the view through 8x42 binoculars and naked eye.  The Pleiades looked great almost right next to it.  Orion was due south and amazing through the binos.  The Hyades in between were rather subdued, even in the binos.  I was way too sleepy to get out a telescope or tripod, so I snapped some hand-held images minutes after the peak with the kit lens on my DSLR and went back to bed.  This one came out the best:

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It fairly accurately displays the range of brightnesses and colors visible, just at low resolution.

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Hi  Paul,  a great report, sounds quite exciting. No chance of seeing anything down here at Knowles Mill, but it was mostly cloudy anyway.  ps.  nice image of the legendary "hairy beast of Howarth" !   Cheers Chris.

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