Jump to content

Banner.jpg.b6007b69ccdf5c69bf18273ddfe023df.jpg

Boots for winter and cold night observing?


OpusElite
 Share

Recommended Posts

With the ever decreasing night time temperatures I've noticed on observing sessions that most people seem to suffer the same problem of cold feet.

I have double layered socks and thermal socks but they don't work well when standing still, i.e. not walking.

USB heated insoles keep the underside of my feet warm, but not the top.

Can anyone recommend good boots that are proven to work well, especially if they aren't too expensive?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, banjaxed said:

Standing on a decent thickness piece of wood or a few layers of cardboard works well for me and I have poor circulation.

Cheaper than snow boots!

I can recommend socks. Gelert Heat Wear are thick, soft, comfortable and warm. The insides have a fleece like feel.

https://www.gelert.com/gelert-heat-wear-socks-mens-414332

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a pair of these heat holder ones which go over my normal socks and I added a merino wool insert into my wellies so I am not in direct contact with the sole which helps immeasurably. Still get cold feet eventually but I figure that just means its time to come in :)

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Heat-Holders-Extra-Winter-Thermal/dp/B01M61WFMR/ref=asc_df_B01M61WFMR?tag=bingshoppinga-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=80745460652503&hvnetw=o&hvqmt=e&hvbmt=be&hvdev=c&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=&hvtargid=pla-4584345018660083&psc=1

Maybe some sort of hiking boot might be an option? Those are usually insulated to a degree but I can't recommend a particular brand ... maybe Karrimor if you want non-expensive.

Edited by wibblefish
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a pair of Grubbs Frostline wellies that are very warm in the winter. They are neoprene with a somewhat foamy kind of overcoat to shoe height, which was a bit concerning at first because i normally associate a bit of weight with durability and these are quite light. I can't recommend them for long walks though as the stitching runs  from the top, right down the back of my heel so a thick pair of socks are required.

One thing i learned from riding a motorbike is that it's important not to touch anything cold without gloves on a very cold morning before setting off because you lose heat every time you do and don't get it back. It's easier to stay warm than to get warm.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Kamik snow boots. Easy to slip on and off thanks to glossy "fur" lining.
Rated at down to -50C and you won't topple even in a 100mph wind. :wink2:
They can usually be found heavily discounted at online dealers.
Black rubber foot and brown suede above. Cosy!  :thumbsup:
 

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I bought a pair of Seeland hunting boots about 10 years ago and they have served me well. They are designed for people who stand still for hours in the frozen North waiting for a moose or something similar to appear. They have a felted inner boot like a 1cm thick oversock, and are completely waterproof (as far as I can tell).

I have been out in -8C, and it was other parts of my body that gave up before my feet did. 

  • Haha 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure youre not overstuffing your boots with socks and insoles? For winter use your boots should be very loose with just regular socks, perhaps even unusable. Cutting blood circulation because of too many layers/too thick even in good boots will be ineffective at keeping the warmth in.

Ensuring a good seal between your boots and pants are also as important. Longjohns in the boots (not tightly) and 1 or 2 layers of pants over the boots will work.

Did plenty of stargazing and imaging at -20 or colder last winter. Cold feet and fingers really kill the mood so its an important issue to fix.

  • Like 4
Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 for Sorel's, I tried all sorts of things before I found these and these do the job.

They are a bit bulky for moving around but they are perfect for keeping warm when you are not moving much.

I have found that it has to be cold enough to wear them or else I cook!

1098932550_20211118_2349563.thumb.jpg.d1fafe3e021c278d54cf291989e6417a.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 for the Muck Boots, however they are pretty expensive now. Can't believe that I only paid £40 for my pair on sale a few years ago from a gun range.

They also work well on black ice for traction.

The thing to remember is that if you are feeling cold in the extremities it usually means you are losing core body heat. Doesn't mean you can wear a thick parka and flip-flops but you'd survive longer than wearing double fleece-lined snow boots in your birthday suit.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, StuartJPP said:

The thing to remember is that if you are feeling cold in the extremities it usually means you are losing core body heat. Doesn't mean you can wear a thick parka and flip-flops but you'd survive longer than wearing double fleece-lined snow boots in your birthday suit.

Very true that. I’ve also found that keeping my legs warm helps keep the feet warm. Totally obvious when you think about it, but a pair of thermal long johns really does help to keep the feet warm.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

US milsurplus extreme cold weather trousers are quite fun (no pockets though 😞). The muck arctic sport stop the increasing foot pain that observing on damp grass leads to. Mine are great to just slip on to go round the shops. there are boots that are even better (eg some Baffin models, but we don’t get -100C often in these parts!)
 

The only bit of me that knows the outside temperature is my nose. If I walk about too much I run the risk of overheating…. Not that I’ve been out in anything too seriously cold yet (London isn’t known for ice storms).

Peter

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Captain Magenta said:

Yes! At surprisingly not-especially-low temperatures!

It’s the dampness that helps suck the warmth right out… the heated insoles I tried and bits of camping mat foam all failed to halt the pain.

Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.