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What did you see tonight?


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On 25/11/2022 at 06:52, josefk said:

The RAF have been drilling low level night flying here every evening this week. I don't know what they're flying but they're pretty big and pretty cool.

They'd have been RAF Eurofighters (Typhoons) flying out of RAF Coningsby, which is just 10 miles from us.

They have been doing a LOT more training flights since the Russians invaded Ukraine..they normally only fly at night one week in 4, although it seems more often recently.

We've had as many as 6 flying in formation over our house at low level a couple of times (daytime only), and  they make a right racket! Impressive sight though.

Dave

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7 minutes ago, F15Rules said:

I agree that Mars is very bright at the moment..have you tried using planetary filters to reduce glare and increase contrast?

I've recently acquired a few filters (for just £25 in excellent used condition), and in the few times I've used them so far, I've found both an orange red and blue filter to really make a difference to the features' visibility and clarity.

Dave

Thanks Dave for your suggestions. I haven’t as yet tried filters on Mars specifically (although previously have had interesting results with Saturn and Jupiter) but have been researching this topic recently. The view last week was superb without filters but I’m going to have a try with my #21 (Orange) and #8 (Yellow) - these likely increase the contrast on the surface features. On your suggestion I’ll try my blue (80A) also. I’ve read a few articles and reviews, and the Baader contrast booster seems to do very well, but I’m inclined to try the items I already have in my kit bag first - once the clouds and thick fog subside. Sounds like they will help the views quite a bit from your experience. Did you buy your filters from SGL ? You found a good deal there 👍🏻

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10 minutes ago, F15Rules said:

They'd have been RAF Eurofighters (Typhoons) flying out of RAF Coningsby, which is just 10 miles from us.

They have been doing a LOT more training flights since the Russians invaded Ukraine..they normally only fly at night one week in 4, although it seems more often recently.

We've had as many as 6 flying in formation over our house at low level a couple of times (daytime only), and  they make a right racket! Impressive sight though.

Dave

Typhoon you say, Dave?
 

28428080-78FC-4942-B7AA-D4429CC9E3FA.thumb.jpeg.0a7caf417783a091f36a3c7be27bbca5.jpeg

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51 minutes ago, Astro_Dad said:

Thanks Dave for your suggestions. I haven’t as yet tried filters on Mars specifically (although previously have had interesting results with Saturn and Jupiter) but have been researching this topic recently. The view last week was superb without filters but I’m going to have a try with my #21 (Orange) and #8 (Yellow) - these likely increase the contrast on the surface features. On your suggestion I’ll try my blue (80A) also. I’ve read a few articles and reviews, and the Baader contrast booster seems to do very well, but I’m inclined to try the items I already have in my kit bag first - once the clouds and thick fog subside. Sounds like they will help the views quite a bit from your experience. Did you buy your filters from SGL ? You found a good deal there 👍🏻

I bought them on the UK Astrobuysell site.

image.png.f25d7ffc4ed3b87cd40740a37c57a576.png

My blue is an 82a, and the orange red is a 23a. So far results on Mars have been promising, I just need a proper couple of hours session to do more detailed checking and comparisons..

Dave

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Just getting back in to the visual side of things whilst taking a hiatus from dso imaging. During Oct and Nov the dso imaging rig was out 2 times, whilst my Meade 80mm achro 22 times. So thought I'm going to do just visual for the foreseeable as I can be set up and observing in seconds in the gaps or not good enough for imaging and no electric or faffing. 

So last night I set up the Meade 80mm on old Eq1 mount in az mode. I did attach the dslr for some moon images and Jupiter too. 

But with my x2 Barlow and hyperflex 7.2-21.5mm lens I had an amazing view of Jupiter with clear banding showing and what I thought was a speck of dirt, until I checked sky safari and it was Ganymedes shadow transiting the disc, wow I thought, I've never seen a transit before. Toured around a bit and getting used to star hopping again. So had a quick peak at Saturn still quite viewable considering the seeing was ropey. Then off to find a couple double stars Almach, Polaris and then Mintaka a  bit later. I know easy ones but fun. Then up to M31, think I viewed M34 cluster, tried to find uranus but a big ask with my scope (I knew I'd just expect a pale dot anyway) and no avail. Later on as Orion rose higher I checked out the trapezium in M42, nice to see all 4 stars and then a quick tour of the moon. All in all a fab evening just sitting a observing, cup of coffee to hand in my sgl travel cup. Wrapped up warmly only my toes just starting to feel the bite of the cold. Have to say it was so good to just observe and get back to it, hoping to look forward to more nights ike this. Sorry for waffling on haha. 

Lee 

IMG_20220920_194043.jpg

Edited by AstroNebulee
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Just a few minutes on the Moon with the binos, I feared the clouds might close in by the time I sorted a scope out. Copernicus (I think?) very prominent on the terminator and rugged terrain in the southern and northern highlands. I also like to see “the man in the Moon” as a footballer, fitting for the World Cup! Serenity, Tranquillity, Nectaris and Fecundity make up the figure and Crisium is the ball they’ve just kicked.

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1 hour ago, allworlds said:

Just a few minutes on the Moon with the binos, I feared the clouds might close in by the time I sorted a scope out. Copernicus (I think?) very prominent on the terminator and rugged terrain in the southern and northern highlands. I also like to see “the man in the Moon” as a footballer, fitting for the World Cup! Serenity, Tranquillity, Nectaris and Fecundity make up the figure and Crisium is the ball they’ve just kicked.

Yes, it was Copernicus, 🙂.

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2 minutes ago, cloudsweeper said:

5.50pm Saturday.  Wife just photo'd Moon and Jupiter in a lovely clear sky for me.  

Will I go out in the cold soon to get some action?  Well, no.....I've got covid!!  😷

Doug.

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It's nice your wife has done this for you Doug.  I hope you have less serious symptoms and you're back at the telescope soon. All the best, Paul

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, paulastro said:

It's nice your wife has done this for you Doug.  I hope you have less serious symptoms and you're back at the telescope soon. All the best, Paul

 

 

 

Thanks Paul.  Feeling rough, but it hasn't gone to my chest, so I'm grateful for that!

Targets lined up for next time out.

Doug.

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(OK, back in action - covid cleared up rapidly, although taste and smell still impaired.)

JUPITER GETS DOUBLE KISS

4.15pm Mon. - 102S grab 'n' go frac in action - Moon (3 days to full) low, east.  Quick look at Schickard on terminator.

JUPITER was the only other object in view, lowish, SE.  Europa lay to the west, Ganymede a similar distance to the east.  Where were Io and Callisto?  Behind?  In front?

I upped the mag to x100 and was delighted to see exactly where they were: Io was 'kissing' the disc on the western (in the sky) edge, and the fainter Callisto was doing the same right on the top of Jupiter.  A fine spectacle!  

I finished after 40 minutes as the cloud got thicker.  Would have liked to see the progress of the moons.

It's great how a session often throws up unexpected, interesting, and unusual views!

Doug.

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05/11

Unfortunately both clouds and work prevented a view of the occultation of Uranus, but the evening got better with clear skies from around 10pm. 

I decided to have a good look at the Moon through the six inch, enjoying nice crisp views of some of the well known features, and paying particular attention to the Terminator/ features around Gassendi, (including craters Billy and Mersenius). 

ACCDA023-597F-4733-87C4-9A14536E3808.thumb.jpeg.486b56fd87f100ad5c0eead782bbcd17.jpeg

I also enjoyed a brief binocular sweep across the sky, enjoying prominent Mars and a fine Orion Nebula (Despite the bright Moon dominating the sky).

Basically just excellent to be outside again after so much fog and cloud !

This morning at around 7am a lovely sunrise coming up over The Dales almost diametrically opposed to a still stunning bright ochra Mars in the NNW started the day well, but sadly no time for a quick session!

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06/11

22:00 h

Building up to the big night…

Intermittently clear skies tonight offering a quick session on Mars with the Heritage Dob again (plus SvBony 7-21mm zoom). Some nice surface features coming through at times but overall fairly poor seeing with the boiling effect all too present, preventing powers much higher than about 100x.  Consulting  the Mars mapper afterwards I had clearly seen glimpses of Mare Sirenum in the South, and Mare Cimmerian towards the SE. Not the sharpest views though but pleasing enough. 

F9732971-1CD9-4F13-AAFB-3EC7F778F2FB.jpeg.2c059d957b55a09baf376c01571eb300.jpeg
 


Our moon was worth another quick look also  - I can imagine how impressive the occultation will be on Thursday - even through binoculars, which given the timing  for me might be all that is practical. 

Edited by Astro_Dad
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Managed to get out for what feels like the first time in ages.  Dense clouds were approaching from the north with steadily, but slowly worsening high clouds causing a pervasive haze.  Much like @Astro_Dad the seeing was pretty dire, with going above x80 not being an option as it was like looking up from the bottom of a swimming pool.

Mars was pretty disappointing.  There wasn't much if any detail visible at all due to the poor seeing.  Jupiter was the worst I've seen and even the equatorial bands were a challenge.

The moon was quite impressive though.  Lovely contrast over by the terminator with some brilliant white bits visible well into the shadow.

would have stayed out longer but my staff night out was yesterday and the recovery is going to be a slow process.

PXL_20221206_214552475~2.jpg

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Hello. Poor seeing last night. Jupiter was “bubbly” to say the least. 
Mars somewhat better.  Went with the “ no dark adaptation route - as I’ve read. Not seeing a lot of difference when looking at planetary.  Work in progress ??!! 
Tty again tonight !!  Brurrrrrrrr

John 

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Out for a brief spell before a few nasty clouds rolled in ... Moon although nearly full showed some nice detail near the edge . Orion Neb , always a favourite although i was looking at it before it got to its highest point . Mars for me remains a bit of a disapointment ... a bit too bright ( keep forgetting about filters ) not giving up much in the way of contrast either . I do blame myself for this though as Mars really needs observing over a long period of time to get the best out of it .Must learn this lesson .

It was a cold evening but , tonight and tomorrow are forecast to be mainly clear , so already planning the warmest clothing ... and maybe a touch of whisky in my tea ... just to make things a little more pleasant  :) 

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Nice to see folks got out in the chilly and damp last night, good on you.
I had more emergency DIY rescue last night for my daughter.

Where she lives it was clear and had a very quick eyeball of planets and moon, wondered if I would get out when home.
As I drove home, only 16 miles away, it clouded up, typical.

Fingers crossed for tonight / morning and Mars though.

Edited by Alan White
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Just came in from a session looking at Mars and Jupiter.

Seeing was mixed, but there were some moments of still air in between... On Mars, the elevation makes a huge difference! Some sketches from earlier below. Alarm clock set for 5.30am, to see Mars come out from behind the moon...IMG_3373.thumb.JPG.3d6a3c9a7ebc270581928ebd29864422.JPG

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30 minutes ago, Froeng said:

Just came in from a session looking at Mars and Jupiter.

Seeing was mixed, but there were some moments of still air in between... On Mars, the elevation makes a huge difference! Some sketches from earlier below. Alarm clock set for 5.30am, to see Mars come out from behind the moon...IMG_3373.thumb.JPG.3d6a3c9a7ebc270581928ebd29864422.JPG

Lovely sketches. Seeing pretty good here, surprisingly good views of Jupiter through the 60mm.

You are not going for the start of the occultation then? I’m going to give it a go.

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Mars showing a northern polar ice cap and low southern hemisphere albedo belt, which I’m trying trying to clarify the name of. But fairly nondescript otherwise.

So I keep returning to my favourite double, Rigel. It’s quite low so extremely scintillatory? but still short work for the Tak 76 DCU. 

BF639295-BD3F-4445-9385-E60D52E04651.jpeg

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