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I saw a star slowly move into another star and then produced some shooting stars for about 15 mins


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Well I'm pretty new to this , but I'm always sat outdoors and looking up to the night sky. Seen the usual sort of activity hundreds of times but the particular occasion when it looked to me 2 stars slowly joining then pumped out stars I really didn't know what I was witnessing 

 

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Hi Matt and welcome to SGL. This sounds interesting. Was this just with your naked eye, or were you using binoculars or a telescope of some kind?

Satellites look very much like moving stars and can be readily seen with the naked eye, but I wouldn't have a ready explanation for the shooting stars phenomena. One of the weirdest things I've seen was what looked like a UFO during daylight, but as I watched it turned out to be an aircraft catching the sunlight. What fazed me was that the location wasn't on any regular air route. Had I not continued to watch, I might have thought to this day that I'd seen a genuine UFO.

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It is my opinion and have no evidence to support this. But I do believe that there are more unpublicised space missions. These may well be military. I once saw two objects weaving across the north eastern sky through binoculars. I believe that I can tell the difference between aircraft and much higher satellites. These objects were not aircraft. I felt disturbed by this and there was as always no explanation.

So if you saw something then I don't believe that people have the right to suggest that you did'nt see something.

Edited by Guest
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Some weird phenomenon involving starlink? But it doesn’t sound like what others have described in observing those. Sounds fascinating. Wish I had seen it! It may remain a mystery. 

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8 hours ago, Matt roofer said:

I know satellites,  planes etc. This to me was something I never seen before so just was wondering if anyone else has seen anything like this atall 

Matt, as others have asked, giving a date, time and approximate direction would help.

When you say shooting stars, what do you mean? Shooting stars normally flash across the sky very quickly, less than a second, whereas satellites move much more slowly. How fast did these move? How fast did the original stars move?

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If you are seeing movement in real time, then what you saw moving must have been relatively close - meaning not in deep space at stellar distances. Barnard's star has the fastest known proper motion relative to the Earth but its motion cannot be seen other than by comparing images taken over time.)

You saw one point of light move into visual alignment with another. (It would be better not to call them stars because that's an assumption and certainly incorrect in at least one of their cases, since stellar motion cannot be seen in real time.) However, one of the points might have been a star, the other something much closer and in motion. This would mean the sudden appearance of the burst of moving points of light at the moment of alignment would have been a chance event. Unlikely but not impossible.

What happened to the relative motion between the two points of light once the 'fireworks' started? If one point did not carry on moving past the other then we can probably eliminate a line of sight effect and conclude that both points were at the same distance (close to Earth) and collided, releasing fragments which caught the light...

Along with millions of others, I once witnessed a rocket fuel dump in perfect observing conditions at our observatory and in the company of Dr René Dumont, probably one of the last professional visual astronomers. We saw a roughly ten-moon-sized nebula (the main hydrogen purge), a horizon-to-zenith halo caused by refraction, a moon sized nebula (a final purge) and a point of light (the tumbling rocket) moving slowly westwards and downwards. It took about ten minutes for them to go from the south where we first saw them to the western horizon. This gives an idea of how fast sub-orbital objects appear to move. I don't know at what altitude the purge took place but it was clearly sub-orbital, yet movement appeared very slow. If you were seeing faster relative movement then the points of light you saw were considerably lower-closer, despite appearances to the contrary. 

One thing's for sure: if a point of light appears to be moving in real time, it is not a star.

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
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I wonder if there was a Starlink deployment at the time? Wasn’t aware of one but it’s possible I guess. A lot depends on the answers to the questions asked, time, date, location, speed etc

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28 minutes ago, Stu said:

I wonder if there was a Starlink deployment at the time? Wasn’t aware of one but it’s possible I guess. A lot depends on the answers to the questions asked, time, date, location, speed etc

There was a launch of Starlink satellites 14 Sept 2021.

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I once saw something odd when on holiday in Corfu. It was broad daylight around three in the afternoon and I was on the terrace of my apartment. I was looking around and glanced up near virtically to witness a bright orange object suddenly appear. It looked star like to start with but broke up into glittery bright pieces of white and orange and disappeared. Must have only been ten seconds. No other objects in the sky at the time. It was in July. I put it down to a fireball entering the Earth's upper atmosphere, burning and breaking up. Never seen anything like it during the day since.

Edited by Nigella Bryant
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