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help with milkyway image(Raw link added) if anyone wants a go


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hi finally got to suprise view in the peaks with my new 14mm samyang to try out,clear skies ,warm.Just set the camera to about 25 secs and f2.8 .took a few shots and this was probably the best,edited in adobe and quite pleased but need more oomph on the milky way ,any suggestions appreciated thanks

DSC_3733edit.thumb.jpg.712f24115d7082c121fead0f8bf96571.jpg

Edited by iwols
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2 hours ago, iwols said:

thanks will try to find a tutorial for that, does this software allow for the star movement between images?

Yes the deep sky stacker, aligns all the stars for you, use kappa sigma clipping when stacking as this will remove pesky satellite trails. This tutorial may help "Milky Way stacking with Deep Sky Stacker https://www.amateurastrophotography.com/milky-way-stacking-with-deep-sky-stacker

though I've not used this one, I just take around 30 exposures and combine, also take a few calibration frames too, so no issues. 

 

 

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On 09/09/2021 at 11:31, iwols said:

hi finally got to suprise view in the peaks with my new 14mm samyang to try out,clear skies ,warm.Just set the camera to about 25 secs and f2.8 .took a few shots and this was probably the best,edited in adobe and quite pleased but need more oomph on the milky way ,any suggestions appreciated thanks

 

what time of day was this? It looks like the sun was either just set, or just about to rise

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2 hours ago, StuartT said:

why so much yellow glow then? Were you looking toward a city?

Probably light pollution, I get it even when I try to image looking over the high St of my rural village 

Edited by AstroNebulee
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21 hours ago, StuartT said:

why so much yellow glow then? Were you looking toward a city?

Trouble with the peaks is, its a very populated national park in the park itself, but also surrounded by major citys. Mancs, Sheffield, Derby and Notts. I always find unlike a lot of other national parks, the peaks really doesn't have decent dark skies, bortle 4 at best I believe. So where ever you point the camera, lower to the horizon are big horrible glows.

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3 hours ago, Grant93 said:

Trouble with the peaks is, its a very populated national park in the park itself, but also surrounded by major citys. Mancs, Sheffield, Derby and Notts. I always find unlike a lot of other national parks, the peaks really doesn't have decent dark skies, bortle 4 at best I believe. So where ever you point the camera, lower to the horizon are big horrible glows.

thanks grant that makes sense thought it was me where do you recommend? cheers

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1 hour ago, iwols said:

 

 

thanks grant that makes sense thought it was me where do you recommend? cheers

It all tordapends how far you're willing to travel, for us in the Midlands, that is the sort of light pollution you kind of have to put up with. Unless you're willing to drive out for 2-3 hours. For example my nearest (That I know of) Bortle 4 is a 30minute drive, but then to get to Bortle 3 probably around 2 hours, bortle 2 about 2:30-3 hours. Even though I live in a smallish town, I find it worse than living in certain big citys, because any direction I drive in, I'm driving towards another damn city. North Derby and Sheffield, East you've got Leicester, West Stafford and Stoke, south Birmingham and Coventry.

https://www.lightpollutionmap.info

Check that map to see how far you're willing to drive :)

My own personal experience is, I don't drive out for a night to observe or image (probably reflects in my images :DDDD, but people get brilliant images from worse skys, so its just because I'm learning haha). I want to drive to the bortle 4, but when push comes to shove, I just set up in my bortle 5 back garden. But what I do is, whenever we go on holiday, I always eye up the darkest skies and make sure I go on a new moon week. Earlier this year I went to Northumberland, turned out to be a cloudy week and got 1 clear night, but it was breath taking on that clear night in a bortle 2, pointing out constellations becomes hard as they're drowned out by thousands of other stars you could never see with your naked eye from anywhere else, clear views of even the dimmer parts of the milkyway around Cygnus (Didnt stay up late enough for the core to rise). In october we're going down to lizards point in cornwall, also bortle 2-3! But also remember clouds ruin your experience, so don't just go for the dark skies, we go to walk to dog and see national parks, nice beaches and new views, if we get any clear skies its a bonus :).

Sorry I feel that this kind of went off on a tanget, but I feel I needed to explain my answer and what I do personally :D

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Taking a set of exposures and stacking them would certainly let you process more aggressively but the stack would, of course, have blurred terrestrial features - trees and horizon. This can be fixed by using Layers to replace the stacked lower part with a single shot.

There is a great deal that can be done in astronomy software to reduce light pollution. If you posted a link to the original RAW data (via Dropbox, for example) we could see what can be teased out of it. Many UK imagers of deep sky objects begin with an entirely orange image - but a good picture can still be found within that.

Olly

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  • iwols changed the title to help with milkyway image(Raw link added)
  • iwols changed the title to help with milkyway image(Raw link added) if anyone wants a go

Hi Iwols,

Were you stood near a blue van by any chance ? If so, that was me as we seem to have parked in the same part of the car park at the same time ! I went walk about however.

I've had a quick look at some of your images and I think you've made things really difficult for yourself by not realising that you don't want to be imaging car head lights. Been there and done that so my first piece of advice is to get any bright lights behind you or better still, out of sight. Those head lights have even illuminated some dust spots on your lens by the look of it. The second would be to get out of the car park. Being in there almost forces you to aim up and not get any foreground interest / framing. There was a gate directly opposite the car park entrance that took you away from the worst of things.

Just to demonstrate, I was across the road in the field about 50 feet from you at 10.30 and took this shot. You can't even tell the road is there but you can still see the far light pollution. 

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This was a number of subs that were stacked in Sequator and it's probably the only stacking app you'll need for static camera shots.  https://sites.google.com/view/sequator/introduction

There are a few YouTube videos on how to use it. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uw0Y9y1axdA and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e4C8iLozEmY

Once you have a stack then you can make a start on processing and knocking down the bright orange. As you can see, I've also done some light painting so ignore that for now.

As to where you could go then if I lived in Donny I'd probably go East into Lincolnshire. I've been in the Ragby area a few times and the Lincolnshire wold area is good too. Don't point you camera at Lincoln or Grimsby and you're quids in :) Try and compose your images as if you were doing a daylight landscape or you'll only catch a few hedges or tree tops.

Dave.

 

 

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thanks dave  went in car park and went left ,so the gate is on the opposite side of the road,what duration/quantity were your images and it really was a clear night first time ive been here,do you think the skywatcher adventurer would be any benefit?

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48 minutes ago, iwols said:

thanks dave  went in car park and went left ,so the gate is on the opposite side of the road,what duration/quantity were your images and it really was a clear night first time ive been here,do you think the skywatcher adventurer would be any benefit?

The Star Adventurer is great for Milky Way photography. It's relatively easy to set up and with a wide angle lens you don't have to worry so much about small tracking or alignment errors. You can then bump up the exposure time for each image and take more in total to produce your final stack.

Here's a shot I did with a Samyang 12mm consisting of 100 30s exposures. It was taken in the North Wales countryside so probably Bortle 3 but it was in August so the sky wasn't getting properly dark anyway. It's not amazing because I'm just a beginner but it gives an idea of what that combo can do. The blur at the bottom of the image is a foreground tree.

 

Milky Way.jpeg

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5 hours ago, iwols said:

thanks dave  went in car park and went left ,so the gate is on the opposite side of the road,what duration/quantity were your images and it really was a clear night first time ive been here,do you think the skywatcher adventurer would be any benefit?

Yep, you were almost next to me ! 

The image I posted here was - Nikon Z6, 10 x 20 seconds, ISO 1600 at f1.8 and the light painting was 2x 10seconds, ISO 800 at f2.8.

If you want to go to this car park again, and I've been round there many times, then you really do need to cross the road and get away from the headlights. There's no where in the car park or on the way to the look out that gives any cover. Almost directly beyond the gate at around 20 metres is an open view. The lone tree is at around 50 metres to the right. If you feel frisky then turn left through the gate and walk about 50 metres back parallel the road then turn right and go onto Owler Tor rocks for some good foreground interest. Don't walk directly to the rocks from the gate or you end up having to carry your gear up and over a few of those rocks. 

The SW Adventurer would be a great idea to supplement the static shots. You can do 30 second subs straight from the camera or 60 second subs ( Or any time really ) with an intervalometer. Try out a few settings with the lens closed down one stop and maybe reduce the ISO so you don't blow out the highlights ( Sky beyond ) Also get a few foreground shots. If you chose your spot carefully then you can image some of the heather that's still blooming.

Have fun,

Dave.

Edited by davew
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