Jump to content

 

1825338873_SNRPN2021banner.jpg.68bf12c7791f26559c66cf7bce79fe3d.jpg

 

Tip- Always WD40 anything that screws in


Recommended Posts

I spent the best part of my weekend trying to unscrew part of my imaging rig. A seemingly small benign part refused to be unscrewed despite me using various wrenches and tools.

A lot of hassle would have been avoided if I had used some WD40 to lubricate the parts before screwing them together.

I have now taken the time to unscrew and lubricate pretty much everything to avoid anymore frustration. I would definitely recommend application of WD40 to anyone is isn’t doing so already.

The part that caused me problems this weekend. In the end I won, but only just after what felt like a gruelling war of attrition.

BA27704F-E494-4317-B5B1-DB5598958733.thumb.jpeg.f93f76b83d446acb790165b48de53193.jpeg

 

Edited by 5haan_A
Typo
  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
  • Confused 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, johninderby said:

Best of all is to use a proper anti-seize compound. Only a thin layer needed but is designed for the job and much longer lasting than WD40. Readily available and not expensive.

Any suggestions for a particular product to use or are they all pretty similar? I ended up just putting a bit of vaseline on some threaded parts to stop them sticking and reduce wear.

2 hours ago, Louis D said:

I'm thinking a thin layer of silicone lube wiped on with a cloth would work well without ever drying out.

Something that puts me off using anything with silicone oils in is this quote by Roland Christen:

"Be careful with any product containing silicone oils. It has a strong tendency to migrate. Can migrate up to a foot a year. If it gets on any optical surface, it will creep into the molecular structure of the glass. If this happens, any metal or oxide coating on the glass will lose its adhesion. THE COATINGS WILL LITERALLY FALL OFF, and there is no way that any new coating will ever adhere again , even if the glass is repolished."

Edited by Andrew_B
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Any pf the big name brands of anti seize such as Permatex or Loctite are fine. The copper type is safe for all metals but there is an aluminium version that may a bit better suited on aluminium parts. On scopes it’s not a demanding application so the copper would be fine. Ceramic anti seize is another option.

Make sure though that the compound doesn’t come into contact with rubber though.You only need a very small amount.

 

 

Edited by johninderby
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

49 minutes ago, Andrew_B said:

Any suggestions for a particular product to use or are they all pretty similar? I ended up just putting a bit of vaseline on some threaded parts to stop them sticking and reduce wear.

Something that puts me off using anything with silicone oils in is this quote by Roland Christen:

"Be careful with any product containing silicone oils. It has a strong tendency to migrate. Can migrate up to a foot a year. If it gets on any optical surface, it will creep into the molecular structure of the glass. If this happens, any metal or oxide coating on the glass will lose its adhesion. THE COATINGS WILL LITERALLY FALL OFF, and there is no way that any new coating will ever adhere again , even if the glass is repolished."

No hope for all our camera optics with their silicone damping grease then. 

I used to use a silicone compound in industrial  holography. No problem with coatings release or glass contamination there.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, skybadger said:

No hope for all our camera optics with their silicone damping grease then. 

I used to use a silicone compound in industrial  holography. No problem with coatings release or glass contamination there.

I wonder if it's a problem that Roland experienced in the past with silicone oils that has since been solved?

I don't know either way, but if I had the choice of a silicone or non silicone-based grease I might be inclined to choose the latter just to be on the safe side.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a few chewed up spacers and threaded rings that were also swines to remove. Had them in a vice trying to undo, they've had heat, straps, you name it! Nothing would budge them. In the end, and what I always go for first now, is a pair of my kids trainers with rubber soles on each hand and stuck items in between, push and twist. Works every time. 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, JamesF said:

You can put as much WD40 as you like on that, but I don't reckon it will fit back on :)

As far as I'm aware, @ollypenrice still recommends boot polish as a lubricant for threaded fittings.

James

This isn't really my recommendation but one very widely circulated in astro circles. I would keep well away from WD40 which will a) get everywhere and b) be squeezed out of the threads over time. You want something which stays put and a little boot polish has many who recommend it.

Olly

  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

+1 for Copper Slip.

WD40, or "Water Displacement, 40th Formula" is not a long-term lubricant, but works as a releasing agent and temporary surface protection. I have had my trusty tube of Copper Slip for several decades, and I would not expect to fit any steel-to-steel fixings without a thin film. I have also used it, in bulk, when replacing steam loco boiler washout plugs - without it, the high-pressure water and thermal cycling, can make them difficult to remove.

Geoff

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll definitely look into getting some anti-seize compound.  I didn't even know it existed.  Thread lock, yes.  Anti-seize, no.  My step rings are always getting locked on each other when attaching auxiliary lenses to camera lenses, and this could be just the thing to make disassembling them when done easier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, Geoff Lister said:

+1 for Copper Slip.

WD40, or "Water Displacement, 40th Formula" is not a long-term lubricant, but works as a releasing agent and temporary surface protection. I have had my trusty tube of Copper Slip for several decades, and I would not expect to fit any steel-to-steel fixings without a thin film. I have also used it, in bulk, when replacing steam loco boiler washout plugs - without it, the high-pressure water and thermal cycling, can make them difficult to remove.

Geoff

WD40 was never designed to be a lubricant. From the outset it was a corrosion-prevention compound for the aerospace industry that was first used by Convair to protect the thin stainless steel skin of the Atlas ICBM!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.