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I currently have a Skywatcher 1145. It's the one without the motor drive or the Go To.

I have absolulty no complaints about the scope, it has been great. It is my first scope, which I have owned now for less than six months, and I have been really impressed with my viewing thus far. Let's face it if it wasn't such a good scope it would not have given me the bug. When I first saw Saturn, felt like a little boy again.

The problem is I don't get as much time for this as I would like. I work nights and am only able to view at about 4 am, so therefore have to be extremly quiet when taking scope from my conservatory to the garden (I feel like some kind of Thief in the night).

As a beginner, I have to run inside the house go to the computer find various locations on Stellarium, then go outside and try to find. Which doesn't help with night vision etc.

Thinking about getting another scope, thinking about getting a Go To scope, as think would save a fair bit of time (as well as me running between house and garden) So what do I get? I am satisfied with the little scopes power, However like most things in life if I could go bigger would do so. Looking at the First Light Optics website could probably afford to go for a Skywatcher 130 Go To scope. Would there be much difference between my current scope and the 130 power wise?

Anyone suggest any other Go To scope that may be woth a look.

I think it really would have to be a Go To Scope just because of time and effort.

Is there much difference in size and weight between a 1145 and a 130 as I have found the 1145 very easy to transfer from inside to outside.

Is the Go Tos very easy to use, do you have to update all the time?

Any info you could provide would be really helpful.

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Hope you sort your little problem out Lord Love Rocket .... I guess a Love Rocket with a bug might be quite embarasing LOL

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I can't reply specifically on the skywatcher goto's but they look very similar to the NexStar SLT Goto's. The Goto is pretty easy to use, you need to level, set the date and time, align on the sky and you're away. I've found with the NexStar, that as long as there is decent power and the alignment is good, the goto is pretty accurate, no updates in an evening required. The tracking is pretty good too.

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I would expect so, I know Celestron sell them with a 114mm reflector on it. As long as you have a set of tube rings you should be able to bolt them to the dovetail they ship with it.

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On the night vision issue, rather than nipping inside to look at Stellarium you'd be better off getting some sky charts (either buy them or print and laminate your own) and take them outside with a red torch.

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Once again thanks for the responses.

Is this mount

http://www.mensgiftshop.com/acatalog/nexstar_60_slt.html

the same as this mount

http://www.scopesnskies.com/prod/celestron/starter-scope/refractor/slt.html

If it is, in theory I could get the first one for £156, same price as the second one, however get am extra scope on top. So I could take off the new scope and then add my Skywatcher 1145 to mount. Would that work?

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Have to agree with GazOc, get yourself a red torch, and a decent book like "Turn Left At orion" or some star charts and you will soon find your way around the night sky, thats what i did, and I also work nightshifts and my nights off are at a premium.

I can now take the opportunity of a couple of hours observing by first having a look on my "Starry Nights" software to see whats up there and when its viewable, then use the basic skills I learned from the above mentioned book to point myself in the general direction. A Telrad finder has been a great help to me, I must add, and you can pick one up second-hand for less than £30, which is a lot cheaper than forking out for a go-to mount, just a thought.

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Thats how I learnt as well.

Star atlas

Red torch

Telrad finder

Comfortable chair

Goto or push to is good for those really hard to find objects. Normal objects such as M31, 42, 13, 27, 57 etc all you need is a star atlas and red torch.

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One thing I've noticed with my goto (and baring in mind I'm very new to all this so I could be wrong) but you seem to need a really wide view of the sky to align it. The stars you align to seem to need to be very far apart so if you can only see one part of the sky from your position you might not be able to align it correctly.

Perhaps someone more authoratitive could confirm/deny

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