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Sunspot or something passing?


Ceph
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I bought a simple plastic solar protection film for my Canon to the eclipse occasion a couple of weeks ago. In Southern Sweden it was just around 1/4 eclipse and the weather was a little cloudy.

Today I had a nice sky and decided to try my cheap filter again to see if I could get some better picture. I gets nothing fancy just the ability to take pictures of the sun.
This is taken with Canon 70D and a Sigma 150-600 Cont. lens. The first pic I took this morning 07:52 I used 600mm and I saw a spot. that spot made me curious.
I also have an x2 adapter to the lens so 11:08 I took some more pictures and filmed this time with the x2 adapter on and the spot is clearly visible now and it seemed to have moved some.
A little while ago 17:52 I took some more pictures and the spot has moved a lot.
The pictures is not edited at all except for that I have resized them to 50% of original size.

So I wonders is the a solar spot or something passing in front of the sun?

pic1-0752.thumb.JPG.8ee43a6d42febbb3606c305debb17070.JPG
 

Picture 2 around 11:00
pic2-1108.thumb.JPG.df9c73638045f976046b8422a98cb1c1.JPG
 

Picture 3 just before 18:00
pic3-1752.thumb.JPG.fc2cf8eeca328e41ed3c6e2c5cdc212d.JPG

 

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Its the position from the earth that your viewing from that has changed which makes it look as though the spot has moved position. Here’s 2 view of Saturn taken 7 hours apart (thanks to Skysafari). Clearly the rings don’t move in reality, just the position of the earth (and the observer) that causes this.

7FC9FA69-12DA-4D9A-9491-021EACACB294.thumb.png.8a3e5d06fb4671f232d80dba7dfefbe0.png4D24E82B-CB10-49AF-869F-4546E31B4F0E.thumb.png.5f515a418e30ca71e02e5b82413943a7.png

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Its a Sunspot yes - these are numbered as Active Regions (AR).   This one is number AR2833 - there's a thread running in the Solar Observing section on this one, link below.  As @Knighty2112 points out most of the apparent movement is due to the earth's rotation, the sun does also rotate every 25 days or thereabouts so if you look again tomorrow its position will have changed in real terms too.  I only recently started looking at the sun with like you a cheap white-light filter holder and I'm fascinated + can do it on a coffee break out of my office window :) 

 

 

 

Edited by SuburbanMak
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Hard to imagen that we moves so much that a spot on the big sun (spot is bigger than Earth I guess) seems to be traveling across the surface in a very high speed.
Even if a "Sunday" itself is around 25 Earthdays, the spot should not moved so much during 12 hours, so most of the movement is ourselves. Even that is hard to take in.

And yes that pic of Saturn says the very same thing.

I have not had time to check the spot today, but I beleive you.

Thank you both for your help and time. Very interesting :)

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1 hour ago, Ceph said:

Hard to imagen that we moves so much that a spot on the big sun (spot is bigger than Earth I guess) seems to be traveling across the surface in a very high speed.
Even if a "Sunday" itself is around 25 Earthdays, the spot should not moved so much during 12 hours, so most of the movement is ourselves. Even that is hard to take in.

And yes that pic of Saturn says the very same thing.

I have not had time to check the spot today, but I beleive you.

Thank you both for your help and time. Very interesting :)

It is not moving, the sun just appears to rotate as it moves across the sky from morning until evening so the spot appears to rotate to a different place on the disk. It actually hasn’t. Spots do take about 12 days or so to remove from one limb to the other, which is the genuine rotation of the Sun ie about 25 days if I recall correctly.
 

These three snaps from SkySafari show how the orientation of the Sun changes relative to us as it moves from sunrise through transit to sunset at the moment.

1EF59686-47F3-4A42-8A63-F9FE1B349B04.png

96C5797E-F725-4BCB-A360-E72F44F6E955.png

15C56F0C-1872-4618-97E3-059F6CCFAB0C.png

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Very interesting and I don't fully understand.
I understands that the spot is not moving by itself, not noticeable anyway .
And I was thinking about the ways written here earlier, no wrong in them but I just could not get the math to add up.
If the suns 1 rotation lap is aprrox. 25 earth days then the spot(sun) will move 1/50 as I had 12 hours between the first and last shot due suns rotation,
noticeable but not much.
Then we have earth movement compared to the sun, it takes us 365 days to complete a lap, thus my camera time was 1/730 lap, this
two numbers will give an angle to make the spot(sun) move very little.
 
During this time we also have the earths rotation to calculate.
I cant calculate my own travel earth distance from my location in southern Sweden during 12 hours from shot 1 to shot shot 2. But I can guess and it would
have been like 6000-8000km more or less, so the last number must have been more or less a number to ignore for the spot on the sun?

This makes me curious as now The sunspot "appears" to have a new location but it has not, are we talking about the light is being bend crossing the atmosphere
or is it only the "tilt" angle of the sun changing so fast or am I more lost than I was before?
I see on the last pictures that the sun seems to be tilting very fast. Is this the simple answer that the sun is "tilting/wobling" so fast? Sorry my question but I am curious


---------

I have now done some editing on one of my shot on the sun now through the white filter and I was surpirsed that there was some structure to find as well, color increased very hard on yellow/red

Sun-edited.thumb.jpg.9486ea0d48d06fdc4018af9ae15ee461.jpg

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10 hours ago, Ceph said:

Very interesting and I don't fully understand.
I understands that the spot is not moving by itself, not noticeable anyway .
And I was thinking about the ways written here earlier, no wrong in them but I just could not get the math to add up.
If the suns 1 rotation lap is aprrox. 25 earth days then the spot(sun) will move 1/50 as I had 12 hours between the first and last shot due suns rotation,
noticeable but not much.
Then we have earth movement compared to the sun, it takes us 365 days to complete a lap, thus my camera time was 1/730 lap, this
two numbers will give an angle to make the spot(sun) move very little.
 
During this time we also have the earths rotation to calculate.
I cant calculate my own travel earth distance from my location in southern Sweden during 12 hours from shot 1 to shot shot 2. But I can guess and it would
have been like 6000-8000km more or less, so the last number must have been more or less a number to ignore for the spot on the sun?

This makes me curious as now The sunspot "appears" to have a new location but it has not, are we talking about the light is being bend crossing the atmosphere
or is it only the "tilt" angle of the sun changing so fast or am I more lost than I was before?
I see on the last pictures that the sun seems to be tilting very fast. Is this the simple answer that the sun is "tilting/wobling" so fast? Sorry my question but I am curious


---------

I have now done some editing on one of my shot on the sun now through the white filter and I was surpirsed that there was some structure to find as well, color increased very hard on yellow/red

Sun-edited.thumb.jpg.9486ea0d48d06fdc4018af9ae15ee461.jpg

The Sun follows a line called the ecliptic which represents its path around the Earth during a year. The Earth is tilted at 23.4 degrees with respect to the ecliptic, so as the Sun follows this line, it appears to rotate from morning until night. These images may help explain it better, the yellow line is the Ecliptic, plus here is a link for some more info.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecliptic

I hope that helps a little

2930B680-0A30-499D-A2B7-962D395AB56D.png

D46C7DFA-80EB-4639-BC43-F91C446ACC5D.png

537F560C-EB35-43B2-BCB8-E844B3F3D5ED.png

1053D270-8AA0-4FAB-B3CE-9225295D3E73.png

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Thanks Stu.

You have just helped to explain why my solar imaging camera is tilted one way in the morning and the other way in the evening.

Now I'm trying to discover how I can pre-set the camera's "uprightness" more accurately by using crosshairs in SharpCap. 

If I can use a feature on the sun to closely follow the line of the crosshairs, using the drive paddle, will this ensure I have the correct camera "tilt?"

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9 hours ago, Ceph said:

I have now done some editing on one of my shot on the sun now through the white filter and I was surpirsed that there was some structure to find as well, color increased very hard on yellow/red

Hi Ceph,

that detail came out pretty well, her is my full disc recording of that day, taken with a SkyWatcher Esprit 150ED:

Sun210616_0735UTC.thumb.jpg.f79ab7d6fac84b326291dedb13ed5978.jpg

 

This one with a Lunt LS80THA in H-alpha shows the size of it:

Sun210616_075724UTC_H-alpha_Earth.jpg.f8504d08a2d4492b7df1402fa671a0fa.jpg

Here another one, taken that same day with a C11 in white-light:

Sun210616_074739UTC_Earth.jpg.9d23a9fdbb7fc4f6d321a35c03a6c8c2.jpg

There is also an animation of that last one.

Nicolàs

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Posted (edited)
10 hours ago, Stu said:

The Sun follows a line called the ecliptic which represents its path around the Earth during a year. The Earth is tilted at 23.4 degrees with respect to the ecliptic, so as the Sun follows this line, it appears to rotate from morning until night. These images may help explain it better, the yellow line is the Ecliptic, plus here is a link for some more info.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecliptic

I hope that helps a little

That really helped, thank you Stu :)

Edited by Ceph
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1 hour ago, inFINNity Deck said:

Hi Ceph,

that detail came out pretty well, her is my full disc recording of that day, taken with a SkyWatcher Esprit 150ED:

This one with a Lunt LS80THA in H-alpha shows the size of it:

Here another one, taken that same day with a C11 in white-light:

There is also an animation of that last one.

Nicolàs

Hi Nicolàs
That was cool, I dont beleive that I ever will buy a Lunt, but the results speaks for it self, very nice :)

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