Jump to content

30 secs banner.jpg

Trying to view Messier objects with 15x70 Celestron Skymaster Binoculars. HELP!!!


Recommended Posts

I just recently got 15x70 Celestron Skymaster binoculars, and finally got a nice clear sky. I'm in bortle zone 4. I looked up online how to find certain messier objects, and looked for them, but i couldn't find them. (btw, i do have a tripod, and i used that most of the time) Why couldn't I find ANY messier objects?? I was certain i would be able to find some.... 
Any tips?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Any specific objects? Many will be quite small in those binoculars. You should be able to see plenty under those skies.

 

Peter

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

I sometimes find the field if view with this size of binoculars can be a little small, you need to be careful to get them pointing in the right direction before you go star hopping. Larger binoculars can have funders attached, not so much easy with smaller ones. 
 

peter

Edited by PeterW
Typo correction
Link to post
Share on other sites

The FOV of a 15x20 is not too large, so finding faint targets is difficult.

Which Skymaster 15x20 model do you have? I've just bought the15x20  Skymaster PRO and it came with a tripod adaptor that also serves as a finder bracket for a red-dot finder. Using one of these and a sturdy tripod would make the task much easier.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just added to the "other"  post to this, basically said work out some bright ones, work out (guess) where they should be, aim binoculars. Then hope. Usually seems to work, well 80% of the time. Did throw in a small selection: Think they were:

M31 - Andromeda Galaxy, M33 - Triangulum Galaxy, M45 - Pleiades, M42 - Orion Neb, M??? - 3 Open Clusters in Auriga, M13 - Globular Cluster in Hercules (along one edge of the square)

C14 - Double Cluster in Perseus (haf way between Cassiopeia and Perseus), C?? - The Hyades Cluster, cluster is dim and bigm easy to find as you locate Aldebaren - Big Red Star to the right of Orions Belt.

M are Messier objects, C are Caldwell Objects. Basically work out the big, bright, easy ones first. Write them down, get a book, estimate where and then find and tick them off.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, PeterW said:

Any specific objects? Many will be quite small in those binoculars. You should be able to see plenty under those skies.

 

Peter

 

20 hours ago, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

I have found the majority of the Messier objects with similar bins, so it is definitely possible. Which ones were you trying to find?

Well, i was trying to find M48, M67, M44, M81, M82, M51, M3, M104. 
Didn't end up finding any of them.... 

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, PeterW said:

I sometimes find the field if view with this size of binoculars can be a little small, you need to be careful to get them pointing in the right direction before you go star hopping. Larger binoculars can have funders attached, not so much easy with smaller ones. 
 

peter

I know.. I tried it tons of times, carefully measuring and hopping..... but i didn't find anything.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Ceramus said:

The FOV of a 15x20 is not too large, so finding faint targets is difficult.

Which Skymaster 15x20 model do you have? I've just bought the15x20  Skymaster PRO and it came with a tripod adaptor that also serves as a finder bracket for a red-dot finder. Using one of these and a sturdy tripod would make the task much easier.

My binoculars are 15x70 skymaster celestron... not 15x20
I don't have a finder... i do have a sturdy tripod.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, PEMS said:

Just added to the "other"  post to this, basically said work out some bright ones, work out (guess) where they should be, aim binoculars. Then hope. Usually seems to work, well 80% of the time. Did throw in a small selection: Think they were:

M31 - Andromeda Galaxy, M33 - Triangulum Galaxy, M45 - Pleiades, M42 - Orion Neb, M??? - 3 Open Clusters in Auriga, M13 - Globular Cluster in Hercules (along one edge of the square)

C14 - Double Cluster in Perseus (haf way between Cassiopeia and Perseus), C?? - The Hyades Cluster, cluster is dim and bigm easy to find as you locate Aldebaren - Big Red Star to the right of Orions Belt.

M are Messier objects, C are Caldwell Objects. Basically work out the big, bright, easy ones first. Write them down, get a book, estimate where and then find and tick them off.

 

3 minutes ago, WolfAstronomer said:

 

Well, i was trying to find M48, M67, M44, M81, M82, M51, M3, M104. 
Didn't end up finding any of them.... 

As you can see in this second quote, those are the ones i tried finding. None of the other objects would be seeable for me until summer i think...


 

Link to post
Share on other sites

M44 should be easy by sweeping between Leo and Gemini…. It’s very obvious when you sweep over it. From there you can hop down to M67 which is much less obvious. M81 should be visible, M51 possibly not. M3 should be a fuzzy ball, I’d get there from the coma cluster or Arcturus. M104 might be hard and I’ve not looked for M48.

Peter

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Try M13. It shows up distinctly as a fuzzy ball (no stars resolved) easily found in the trapezium forming the body of Hercules. Note that you should not expect to see anything like the photos, stars are only really easily resolved with an 8" scope 

Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

The open star clusters are probably the easiest deep sky targets to see with binoculars so things like the double cluster in Perseus (not a Messier object), M 35 in Gemini, M44 in Cancer, the clusters in Auriga etc, etc. Asterisms such as the "coathanger" in Vulpecula or "Eddies Coaster" in Cassiopeia are also nice binocular targets. Some more of these here:

https://britastro.org/journal_item/22500

The brighter globular clusters appear as condensed fuzzy spots and there are a number worth seeking out. Most galaxies and nebulae are somewhat less distinctive. Many can actually be seen, or at least glimpsed, with 70mm and even 50mm aperture binoculars but they are often small and subtle and can be easily overlooked by the inexperienced observer.

 

 

Edited by John
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/05/2021 at 03:29, PeterW said:

M44 should be easy by sweeping between Leo and Gemini…. It’s very obvious when you sweep over it. From there you can hop down to M67 which is much less obvious. M81 should be visible, M51 possibly not. M3 should be a fuzzy ball, I’d get there from the coma cluster or Arcturus. M104 might be hard and I’ve not looked for M48.

Peter

Ok, thank you, i will try that tonight

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/05/2021 at 03:36, michael.h.f.wilkinson said:

Try M13. It shows up distinctly as a fuzzy ball (no stars resolved) easily found in the trapezium forming the body of Hercules. Note that you should not expect to see anything like the photos, stars are only really easily resolved with an 8" scope 

ok i will try to have a look at m13

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 22/05/2021 at 05:12, John said:

The open star clusters are probably the easiest deep sky targets to see with binoculars so things like the double cluster in Perseus (not a Messier object), M 35 in Gemini, M44 in Cancer, the clusters in Auriga etc, etc. Asterisms such as the "coathanger" in Vulpecula or "Eddies Coaster" in Cassiopeia are also nice binocular targets. Some more of these here:

https://britastro.org/journal_item/22500

The brighter globular clusters appear as condensed fuzzy spots and there are a number worth seeking out. Most galaxies and nebulae are somewhat less distinctive. Many can actually be seen, or at least glimpsed, with 70mm and even 50mm aperture binoculars but they are often small and subtle and can be easily overlooked by the inexperienced observer.

 

 

ok ty

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By Arshad Wali Muhammad
      Hello 
       
      I need reviews on Celestron CGX L. Is it a good mount ? My scope is Celestron cpc EdgeHD 1100. 
       
      reliabilty ?
      disconnetions ?
      tracking ? 
       
      My current mount is Celestron Alt Azm Mount and  I have all my accessories from Celestron like focus motor, Starsense, Skyportal, All Star Polar. Allignment etc, these have made my life very easy. Else I do have option to buy ioptron CEM70 but I’m not familiar with the product but most of my Celestron accessories which can be connected to CGXL will go in waste. 
       
      Secondly how important is the GPS that I will have to buy separately because CGXL doesn’t have built in. 

      Thirdly I can buy CGXL without mount. Is there any way I can fit this on to my current Alt Azm Mount? Or Pier. I can easily save 1100 USD. 
       
      Right now my Telescope is fitted on the Alt Azm Mount and giving me lots of disconnections on WiFi. That’s the problems I am facing. If it’s no more in new CGX L I would go for it. 
       
      im confused. 
    • By Liv
      I saw another post similar to this on here and the replies seemed to be very believable and informative so I thought I’d ask here.
       
      For the past week or so I have been sitting outside at night between 10pm and 12pm and just watching the stars come out. I haven’t been using my telescope because I didn’t feel like I would need it. The skies have been very clear and the stars beautiful but I’ve been noticing some strange happenings in the sky. I’m not saying ufos I’m just wondering what these may be, so let me explain further.
      First my mother and I witnessed a singular light, white light flying through the sky. There were no navigation lights or sounds. Just a singular light flying by, we ruled out airplanes because it was two low to be one but was also way too fast to be a helicopter. I’ve seen them twice and they always seem incredibly high up and barely distinguishable from stars. They aren’t shooting stars because they fly completely differently. Another thing I have noticed are flashes, like stars that get bigger and then suddenly disappear, like a flash. And I mean completely disappear! Now I’m sure I’ve read of these things before in one of my astronomy books but I’m honestly not sure what they could be. They fly and react different to any aircraft or stars so I’m intrigued. They also appear as if they are stars and look like they fly or flash right next to real stars. 
       
      Now I feel like I need to note that I know a lot about astronomy it has amazed me since childhood and I am a skeptic. My family has a long history of being in the airforce, mostly as engineers and creators of new technology so when it comes to lights in the sky we usually have a good answer, but no one could explain these sightings. I also live near an airfield so I don’t understand why (if these aircraft were from there) were flying so incredibly high up, so fast and so far away from the airfield, they seemed to come out of the night and fly off and back into the dark. It was also completely clear nights with little clouds during these sightings.
      I’m asking here because I believe anyone who reads this will have a good answer for me and won’t immediately ridicule me for thinking I saw a UFO. Please let me know if there’s anything you think this could be or any questions you have! Thank you so much for reading and happy stargazing!
    • By kman42
      I've seen a Celestron FI 130 come up locally for pretty cheap. Had a close look at it, and since it has a dovetail mount I can remove the scope and put my DSLR rack on it. The aluminium legs are very slightly wobbly, but I'm pretty sure I can stiffen the tripod with a few extra bracing members. At first glance it looks like a cheap and easy way of getting motorised tracking for my Astrophotography, but my main question is how good is the tracking on the mount? Is it accurate enough for wide field Astrophotography up to about a 400mm lens? 
    • By StarPrincess
      Moon Surface 16 April 2021 21:32 Celestron NexStar 6SE ZWO ASI 462mc
    • By CKERR
      Hello,
       
      I am new to using a telescope but am an avid manual reader and usually a fairly quick study.     I have bought a pre-loved Celestron Nexstar Evolution 9.25 {originally purchased in Sydney Australia in 2014} and am struggling to do the 2 star alignment.   I have reset the scope to Factory Settings and have added my location, correct time, STD or DLS time; time zone etc.     I take the scope out and level it, align the marks on the base of the motor and on the arm that holds the scope.   I point the scope whilst still levelled and marks aligned North.     I try to align to Sirius and the scope points to my feet.    I have tried following the steps but nothing is working.   
       
      I have tried using the SkyPortal App and that is more of a success but still not quite.   I try to align Sirius and it will point up and very close to the star but not aligning with it.   I ask it to GoTo the stars in Orion’s Belt and it will be close but not quite so not aligned....at least it isn’t pointing to my feet.
       
      Any suggestions would be welcomed.   Thank you.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.