Jump to content

92335031_Perseidsmeteorshowerbanner.jpg.f082cb58353bce3cc854fb958f76fc98.jpg

Recommended Posts

question I have a celestron telescope,and I am still new too observing the stars and plants , I have a 10 mm lens,and a 20mm lens, what  am trying to figure out is what lens is better for looking at the stars and plants,I will eventually get the hang of my telescope,but am new to using my telescope, I also have celestron  binoculars that I am using at the moment, and have been going out on my porch in the early morning to gaze at our amazing cosmos , but will soon start to use my scope,for gazing  at our vast cosmos 👾

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, goddasgirl2021 said:

question I have a celestron telescope,and I am still new too observing the stars and plants , I have a 10 mm lens,and a 20mm lens, what  am trying to figure out is what lens is better for looking at the stars and plants,I will eventually get the hang of my telescope,but am new to using my telescope, I also have celestron  binoculars that I am using at the moment, and have been going out on my porch in the early morning to gaze at our amazing cosmos , but will soon start to use my scope,for gazing  at our vast cosmos 👾

Hi goddasgirl

Both eyepieces are good for stars and planets. The 20mm will give you a wide view and the 10mm will give you a higher magnification and a narrower view.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Astro Noodles said:

Hi goddasgirl

Both eyepieces are good for stars and planets. The 20mm will give you a wide view and the 10mm will give you a higher magnification and a narrower view.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, goddasgirl2021 said:

thank you 

question how do you get a high reputation in this forum, am still new in this forum,and want to get a good 

Rep in this forum with all the members

Just keep posting. 🙂

Link to comment
Share on other sites

question How do you get  a  good  community Reputation,I am new in this community, and as a new member of this community, I want to 

get a good  reputation,make a lot of friends in this community.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 12/05/2021 at 16:42, goddasgirl2021 said:

question I have a celestron telescope,and I am still new too observing the stars and plants , I have a 10 mm lens,and a 20mm lens, what  am trying to figure out is what lens is better for looking at the stars and plants,I will eventually get the hang of my telescope,but am new to using my telescope, I also have celestron  binoculars that I am using at the moment, and have been going out on my porch in the early morning to gaze at our amazing cosmos , but will soon start to use my scope,for gazing  at our vast cosmos 👾

What celestron model do you have? The focal length and aperature of your scope will determine how well (read big and detail) you can see in the planets. The moon is always a good place to start.

This site will give you an idea of how the objects are likely to be seen in your scope https://www.stelvision.com/en/telescope-simulator/

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hello goddasgirl, and welcome!

This is your telescope...

https://www.celestron.com/products/travel-scope-70-portable-telescope

It is a 70mm f/5.7 achromat, or refractor, and with a rather short, 400mm focal-length.  The telescope is configured for low-power, wide-field views, and not unlike your binoculars.  Observing the planets requires medium-to-high powers in order to see them well, up close.  The planets become interesting at around 150x.  Let's see what you would need to reach that...

400mm ÷ 150x = a 2.7mm eyepiece; very short indeed.

There's the problem, a lack of 2.7mm eyepieces in the marketplace.  Quite frankly, the focal-length of your telescope is a good bit too short to make it easy to reach the higher powers for observing the planets and double-stars.  I have this Celestron "AstroMaster" 70mm f/13 achromat...

4c.jpg.35cebede8c71271379488b9770f59060.jpg

Note the longer length of the tube, and compared to your own.  That telescope has a 900mm focal-length.  Let's see what it would take to reach 150x...

900mm ÷ 150x = a 6mm eyepiece; there, that's better, as 6mm eyepieces are readily available online.

Now, you can get a 2x-barlow...

https://agenaastro.com/gso-1-25-2x-achromatic-barlow-lens.html

You will insert the barlow into the telescope first, then your diagonal into the barlow, then your 10mm eyepiece into the diagonal.  That combination will give you an effective, simulated 3.3mm eyepiece, and for a power of  121x.  If you use a 9mm eyepiece(133x); if an 8mm(150x).  Now, that's not taking into account focussing issues that may arise.  

Then, the diagonal that came with your telescope is an Amici-type diagonal, and primarily for daytime/terrestrial observations; birds in trees, ships at sea, that sort of thing.  It can be used at night, but for nighttime use a star-diagonal is best...

https://agenaastro.com/celestron-1-25-telescope-star-diagonal.html

At almost f/6, a star-prism shouldn't introduce too much additional false-colour when viewing brighter objects, if any.  In any event, a comparable, economical star-mirror is unavailable, and possibly into 2022.

If you have any questions, we'll be here to answer them, and to the best of our abilities.  Enjoy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.