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So i have confirmed that I am the first amateur in the world to image flux tubes in calcium light.

accurate pointers added to the first image,  this was not the first time I have captured these;  But it is the first time I have looked into this indepth.     

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_tube

 

 

81540075_calciumfluxropes.gif.379149c0292d499ea8e569117895d364.gif 

 

 

 

here are my previous images recorded on November 5th 2020, this was  the first time i ever captured flux tube's, and I had no idea I was the first amateur to image these in calcium light.

 retreat.gif.71400d5896a83d864572fc67976d1038.gif  132787307_calciumfluxtubeshighresolutionbyapollolasky.gif.1fe768fcbf07232cf191aab52905c5ee.gif

 

 

Captured with an explore scientific 127mm x 1200mm,  a skybender, and a meade #140 barlow operating at 3x using a basler aca1920-155um camera and a basler aca720-520 camera    Seeing conditions were obviously more favorable last year and I intend to look for these with a bigger scope.

 

Processed with Imppg (thank you @GreatAttractor))

 

Edited by Kitsunegari
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Congrats! Nice to see world firsts over here on SGL.

Do you think we are near the peak of what's possible for amateurs? Could e.g. better cameras in time do even more or are we already towards the limit?

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7 hours ago, Luke said:

Congrats! Nice to see world firsts over here on SGL.

Do you think we are near the peak of what's possible for amateurs? Could e.g. better cameras in time do even more or are we already towards the limit?

 

Right now there are new generation 3 sony sensors ready to be incorporated ;  they are super  speed with excess of 200 frames per second , with greater than 20megapixel high resolution .    Most computer owners could  not fit the bandwidth load of the data coming out that fast.    

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