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Decided to use the Heritage 130p as a quick grab and go. Using a 9x50 finder scope went straight to M52. Used a SvBony 10 to 30 zoom and located the Nova. Estimated at around mag 8. Seemed the same as 2 nights ago.

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Tonight I observed the nova with 11x70 binoculars. It looked around the same brightness that it has for the past few nights.

With the more transparent skies this evening M52 showed quite nicely with the binoculars.

 

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A couple more shots from me. The first shows the brightness difference to SAO610 a bit better, and the second catches M52.

 

E6936DC3-FA31-4583-8B25-4764E15BF2C2.jpeg

3066A864-0592-4E90-A830-92C2B10EAAED.jpeg

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Had another look tonight. It seems to be holding it's brightness. I thought it looked a tad dimmer at first but not entirely sure.

Cheers

Ian

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My first look for a few days. 30 x 30 sec stacked in ASTAP.

Photometry (such as it is in my hands) gives a magnitude of 8.42, holding up nicely. I was surprised to see it still outshining it's neighbour.

 

2094451739_NOVA_CAS2021-04-0930x30LEQMODHEQ56ZWOASI178MC_stacked.thumb.jpg.3a35b7a8f61335cb7715bd1e68c837ed.jpg

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9 minutes ago, John said:

Just had another look at this nova. Still looking around magnitude 8.0 or thereabouts.

 

Had it about that last night John. Not checked tonight yet.

This one is certainly hanging around 👍🏻

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1 hour ago, laudropb said:

..... involving a white dwarf and a close companion.....

Sounds like a dodgy headline from tomorrows papers to me :grin:

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I managed an image through the Genesis tonight at x16. Quite nice to see it in a wider context, similar to a binocular field really, 5 degrees.

139F0E54-45C6-4FCD-A29F-C9AAA1F819CD.jpeg

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10 hours ago, laudropb said:

Do we know if this a classic nova Jeremy involving a white dwarf and a close companion main sequence star ?

I assume so, but not seen any reports. White dwarf primary, certainly but not seen spectral classification of the 2ndary 

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10 minutes ago, JeremyS said:

I assume so, but not seen any reports. White dwarf primary, certainly but not seen spectral classification of the 2ndary 

My simple understanding of the way that novae work is that the white dwarf is accreting matter from the secondary star so I wonder if that, over time, changes the spectral classification of the latter ?

I also wonder if this one will result in a nova remnant ?

I'm probably over-simplifying a complex process :rolleyes2:

 

Edited by John
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1 hour ago, John said:

My simple understanding of the way that novae work is that the white dwarf is accreting matter from the secondary star so I wonder if that, over time, changes the spectral classification of the latter ?

I also wonder if this one will result in a nova remnant ?

I'm probably over-simplifying a complex process :rolleyes2:

 

During the eruption the spectrum will be dominated by the hot accretion disc rather than the stars. Need a quiescent spectrum to get the stars. even that can be tricky 

The nova eruption certainly blows off gas into space so there will be a remnant shell. Might take a while to become large enough to be visible on large pro scopes, if at all

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Not too much difference in mag tonight, I have started to see SAO 20610 next door however which is recorded as mag 9.0 so certainly getting dimmer. 

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My first peek in a good while.

Poor sky, high cirrus illuminated by the waxing gibous Moon! Surprised I got anything. 22 x 30 sec exposures, live stacked in ASTAP. Photometry by my hand reports a magnitude of 9.1 but there looks to be vistually no difference between now and my last image.

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Edit: Here is a more fully processed version. Still limited by the poor conditions:

image.thumb.png.da15a2895364a0bf50794c8a9734e980.png

 

Edited by Paul M
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I have just drawn a light curve of the nova until today (Apr 25). It has maintained its brightness very well and is still mag 7.8 to 8.0.

Keep watching as it will fade at some point!

Data are from the BAA Variable Star Section and the AAVSO databases. The pink horizontal line at the bottom is what is thought to be the nova's quiescent magnitude

1514566895_NovaCas2021LC.png.d6cbea286d5b89b511dc84d4f57d0c79.png

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