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Thanks for the heads up, Jeremy. Could I ask how to use the chart in the link? I’ve often tried and failed to translate those type of charts into something I could relate back to SkySafari. I struggle to identify the larger stars to the find the equivalent star field. 

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23 minutes ago, Littleguy80 said:

Thanks for the heads up, Jeremy. Could I ask how to use the chart in the link? I’ve often tried and failed to translate those type of charts into something I could relate back to SkySafari. I struggle to identify the larger stars to the find the equivalent star field. 

It's half a degree south of open cluster M52. Quite easy to find when using the right side of Cassiopeia's W as pointers.

Edit: here's a zoomable DSS map centered on the correct location.

Edited by Waddensky
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16 minutes ago, Littleguy80 said:

Thanks for the heads up, Jeremy. Could I ask how to use the chart in the link? I’ve often tried and failed to translate those type of charts into something I could relate back to SkySafari. I struggle to identify the larger stars to the find the equivalent star field. 

Simple way as @Waddensky says: just S of M52.

The way to locate is to use the variable star chart link I sent. When that displays there is a link that says Plot Another Chart. You can then choose the scale you prefer. If you chose chart scale A you get this 15 deg view. You can compare that chart with a star atlas and see that the brightest star (marked 23, i.e. mag 2.3) is beta Cas, and star 35 (mag 3.5) is iota Cep.

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43 minutes ago, Littleguy80 said:

All excellent, that helps a lot. Thank you both very much! Looking clear early on this evening so hopefully will get a chance to try and spot this :) 

Hope you get it Neil :smiley:

Not looking clear at all here otherwise I'd be planning to do just the same.

Thanks for the "Heads up" Jeremy :thumbright:

Hopefully it will stay bright enough to observer for a few days.

 

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3 minutes ago, JeremyS said:

Latest data I’ve seen have it at mag 7.9

Looks like Sunday might be my first chance.

Same here 🤞

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Just went out with the 10x50 and I found the nova! It's easy to locate using the rhombus-shaped asterism including 4 Cas, its minor axis points roughly to Nova Cas 2021, close to HD 220819 (mag 6.6) and a bit farther from M52. I am no variable star observer by a long shot, but to my eyes, it looked brighter than HD 220770 (mag 7.8) but not as bright as HD 220167 (7.2).

Edited by Waddensky
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7 minutes ago, Waddensky said:

Just went out with the 10x50 and I found the nova! It's easy to locate using the rhombus-shaped asterism including 4 Cas, its minor axis points roughly to Nova Cas 2021, close to HD 220819 (mag 6.6) and a bit farther from M52. I am no variable star observer by a long shot, but to my eyes, it looked brighter than HD 220770 (mag 7.8) but not as bright as HD 220167 (7.2).

That’s excellent. Well done 👍🏻 

I was thinking that rhombus might be a good indicator 

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Well you lot are better than me! I’m in the right field, I think, with the 150p and I’m blowed if I can identify it. Any pointers on this chart appreciated! Newt view, 2.2 degree field

28C949B5-EB21-4422-8E2D-C6587EF8C804.png

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Here is an aavso-chart of the same area. Note the long chain of stars-asterism at 7 o’clock.

The nova forms a nice triangle with the 90 and 91 stars.

5FBD0140-9B79-4828-AB9A-B8F434C43F0E.png

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52 minutes ago, davhei said:

Here is an aavso-chart of the same area. Note the long chain of stars-asterism at 7 o’clock.

The nova forms a nice triangle with the 90 and 91 stars.

5FBD0140-9B79-4828-AB9A-B8F434C43F0E.png

Thanks very much, that’s a very useful chart and confirms I did see it 👍👍

To me it looked the same brightness as HD220720 which is mag 7.8.

M52 was basically invisible to me at low power in the 150p with 24mm Panoptic. Popping a 12.5mm BGO in allowed me to see it with averted  vision, and going to 6mm helped a little more but it still required averted vision for the stars to pop nicely into view. Limiting magnitude through the scope with the 24mm was somewhere around mag 9.9 I think, whilst most of the M52 stars are 10. something or dimmer.

Nice to have caught the Nova at the first opportunity. Thanks very much @JeremyS for the heads up! 👍👍

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How long do these usually events last ?

Do we know how bright the star was prior to the outburst ?

Thanks :smiley:

 

Edited by John
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