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Mandel-Wilson 3 - The Volcano Nebula


gorann
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The Volcano Nebula is Nr 3 in the Mandel-Wilson Catalogue of Integrated Flux Nebulae (IFN). IFN is a very faint type of nebulosity that is thought to be diffusely and collectively energized by all the stars in the galaxy rather than a single star (like in reflection nebulae). It is therefore very faint and is best imaged with a rather large parture short focal lenght telescope (i.e. with a low f-value), like the RASA 8, and a relaively long total integration time. Then a dark site is also needed. My SQM showed 21.4 on this night and the lack of major mishaps and clouds allowed me to collect 8.3 hours. To the right part of the image (containing M81 and M82) I added an additional 4.7 hours that I collected with the same set-up in February.

I actually did not need to stretch the data so far that I run into any major noise problems and I have only done a gentle HiPass filtering to improve the contrast a bit. So there is more to bring out but I fear it may make it look messy and I kind of like it the way it is (at least right now).

A little detail I like is that blue bubble that appears to surround M82. I first feared it may be an artifact but searching the web I found it on other deep images of M82.

Data gathered the night 7-8 March with the RASA 8 (f/2) and ASI2600MC (no filter, gain 100, -15°C). 125 x 4 min. The February data added was 71 x 4 min. So totally 13.1 hours - so far my record with the RASA 8😀.

 

20210307-8 Volcano Neb RASA PS32smallSign.jpg

Edited by gorann
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7 minutes ago, Laurin Dave said:

Amazing!!! 

Dave

Thanks a lot Dave! I am actually quite happy with it, especially since it will be the last one for a while. Now clouds have settled and 20 cm of snow is promised here soon - spring is on a halt.

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7 minutes ago, Knight of Clear Skies said:

Very nice Gorann, nicely framed to fit in both the brightest part of the IFN while squeezing in Arp's Loop. This was my target last night with the Samyang 135mm f2.

Thanks! Framing was a bit of planning and a lot of luck.

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11 minutes ago, Knight of Clear Skies said:

Very nice Gorann, nicely framed to fit in both the brightest part of the IFN while squeezing in Arp's Loop. This was my target last night with the Samyang 135mm f2.

PS. You just made me look up Arp's loop and apparently it is probably not associated with M81 (as suggested by Arp) but IFN, which is rather clear in my image.

https://www.cosmotography.com/images/small_ngc3031.htm

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2 minutes ago, gorann said:

PS. You just made me look up Arp's loop and apparently it is probably not associated with M81 (as suggested by Arp) but IFN, which is rather clear in my image.

https://www.cosmotography.com/images/small_ngc3031.htm

Yes, it appears to IFN which the disc of M81, and is often mistaken for an unusual dust lane in the galaxy itself.

I found a little bit of IFN in Camelopardalis last year, looking at the Mandel-Wilson Catalogue could it be a part of MW 6?

Edited by Knight of Clear Skies
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3 minutes ago, Knight of Clear Skies said:

I found a little bit of IFN in Camelopardalis last year, looking at the Mandel-Wilson Catalogue could it be a part of MW 6?

Maybe. Found this image on the net from a talk given by Mandel:

Mandel-Wilson nebulae map.png

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1 minute ago, Adreneline said:

Inspiring Göran. Another really thought provoking image.

Adrian

Thanks Adrian! Only very few images seem to exist of this one.

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1 hour ago, gorann said:

The Volcano Nebula is Nr 3 in the Mandel-Wilson Catalogue of Integrated Flux Nebulae (IFN). IFN is a very faint type of nebulosity that is thought to be diffusely and collectively energized by all the stars in the galaxy rather than a single star (like in reflection nebulae). It is therefore very faint and is best imaged with a rather large parture short focal lenght telescope (i.e. with a low f-value), like the RASA 8, and a relaively long total integration time. Then a dark site is also needed. My SQM showed 21.4 on this night and the lack of major mishaps and clouds allowed me to collect 8.3 hours. To the right part of the image (containing M81 and M82) I added an additional 4.7 hours that I collected with the same set-up in February.

I actually did not need to stretch the data so far that I run into any major noise problems and I have only done a gentle HiPass filtering to improve the contrast a bit. So there is more to bring out but I fear it may make it look messy and I kind of like it the way it is (at least right now).

A little detail I like is that blue bubble that appears to surround M82. I first feared it may be an artifact but searching the web I found it on other deep images of M82.

Data gathered the night 7-8 March with the RASA 8 (f/2) and ASI2600MC (no filter, gain 100, -15°C). 125 x 4 min. The February data added was 71 x 4 min. So totally 13.1 hours - so far my record with the RASA 8😀.

20210307-8 Volcano Neb RASA PS31smallSign.jpg

Wow! You're on a roll Göran!

The Mandel picture looks more like the clouds that hang about here :).

Ian

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2 hours ago, The Admiral said:

Wow! You're on a roll Göran!

The Mandel picture looks more like the clouds that hang about here :).

Ian

Thanks a lot Ian! Same here right now🥴

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What a superb image, great capture !  Am trying to dial in my RASA 8 and 2600 combo now so can appreciate what you’ve been through to get this right.

Thanks for sharing

Robert

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7 minutes ago, robertm said:

What a superb image, great capture !  Am trying to dial in my RASA 8 and 2600 combo now so can appreciate what you’ve been through to get this right.

Thanks for sharing

Robert

Thanks Robert!

Yes, getting distances right is the major problem, especially since I move between using an NBX filter (when the moon is out) and no filter for RGB. I often have to accept some long stars in the corners and deal with them in processing. Takes an extra half hour. Using an APS-C camera is really a bit past the limits of this scope so I cannot complain. What has surprised me is how easy it is to focus and how well it keeps focus not only during the night but from night to night. Celestron really got the mirror holding sorted out in this scope.

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3 minutes ago, gorann said:

Thanks Robert!

Yes, getting distances right is the major problem, especially since I move between using an NBX filter (when the moon is out) and no filter for RGB. I often have to accept some long stars in the corners and deal with them in processing. Takes an extra half hour. Using an APS-C camera is really a bit past the limits of this scope so I cannot complain. What has surprised me is how easy it is to focus and how well it keeps focus not only during the night but from night to night. Celestron really got the mirror holding sorted out in this scope.

It good that yours is working well, I’m finding mine a bit challenging at the moment... one for another thread.

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14 minutes ago, robertm said:

It good that yours is working well, I’m finding mine a bit challenging at the moment... one for another thread.

There could of course be individual differences related to quality control. I recently bought a second RASA 8 and ASI2600MC with the aim of setting up a dual rig. I could be in for a surprise......

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