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I have a Skywatcher 127 SynScan AZ GOTO telescope. I find it pretty good for planetary observation but disappointing for DSO.

I'm considering a Skywatcher  250PX Flex Tube SynScan GOTO Dobsonian. To start with just for observation but eventually for astrophotography.

Any advice from the forum please?

 

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You'll need a field derotator for DSO photography with an alt-az goto mount.  Alternatively, you can stack lots of much shorter exposures.  I believe there's a thread on SGL covering this technique.

Another alternative is electronically assisted observing using night vision technology.

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22 hours ago, Louis D said:

You'll need a field derotator for DSO photography with an alt-az goto mount.  Alternatively, you can stack lots of much shorter exposures.  I believe there's a thread on SGL covering this technique.

Another alternative is electronically assisted observing using night vision technology.

Thanks Louis D. I never heard of a field derotator before! It seems like adding an extra layer of complexity!

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11 hours ago, Zermelo said:

The folk who image DSOs on alt-az hang out here:

Thanks Zermelo, I couldn't find it! Interesting read

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On 28/02/2021 at 20:03, vocalis said:

I'm considering a Skywatcher  250PX Flex Tube SynScan GOTO Dobsonian. To start with just for observation but eventually for astrophotography.

I can vouch for the 10 Inch Skywatcher Flextube on DSO observing - I have the model without GOTO.

Had it since November and can find very some nice dull DSO's from my back garden in a Bortle 5 area. Yet to take it to dark skies but will definitely be venturing out soon enough!

Can't give any advice on the imaging side as I've never tried it!

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For deep-sky observation, the bigger the aperture, the better. It will give you the ability to use more magnification so you can enlarge faint objects to the threshold of detection. Additionally, it will give you a higher resolution so it will be great for planetary and lunar observing too. The simplest/cheapest way to get a large aperture, is to buy a dobson. GOTO is a matter of taste/convenience but not really necessary in my opinion and adds more compexity.

Astrophotography is another branch of the hobby, and usually requires other equipment, and a whole other budget.

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The other thing to consider for DSO is your skies/light pollution. My skies are Bortle 8+ so I have little chance of seeing anything but the brightest DSO’s even if a chuck  a 12” mirror at them.

Now, if I were under Bortle 4 skies I’d be laughing with my 10” SCT. As it happens I mainly use that for close in lunar obs which is a bit of a waste really. If you have nice dark skies then you’ll see more through a 6” newt than I will through a 12”.

The reason I mention this is when you start looking at AP you really need a good EQ mount and a smaller newt is easier on the mount than the 250 you suggest. With this in mind I’d be tempted by a Skywatcher 150P and perhaps a decent motorised EQ mount. The 150P is a great scope and will have a wider field of view to your 127 and has around 33% more light gathering due to the larger mirror.
 

The 250 will be difficult to tame for a beginner to AP given its focal length and size and the mount entirely unsuitable. If you are going to stock with visual then it’s a good choice :)

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