Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

The Messier Craters from a different viewpoint


Recommended Posts

I've been observing the moon tonight, like many of us I expect.

The craters Messier and Messier A, with the distinctive comet-type rays extending from the latter, are nicely on show in the Mare Fecunditatis and will be for the next couple of days, clouds allowing. Well worth a look though any telescope.

While finding out more about this interesting pair of craters I came across this fascinating photo in the Internet Archive. It shows the Apollo 16 Lunar Module "Orion" in lunar orbit while it is being inspected from the Command Service Module "Casper", the photo being taken from the latter craft of course. And in the background, on the lunar surface are the craters Messier A and Messier. Not an image that I've seen before.

You can click on the image to see it at a much larger scale and very impressive it is :smiley:

https://archive.org/details/as16-122-19533

Edited by John
  • Like 7
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a great photo, the Messier craters are one of my favourite lunar features.

That lunar module looks like something from the scrap heap challenge tv show!

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, incredible image from long ago!

Thanks for posting the link.

Is it just me, or does the one side of the LM look pretty beat up?

I have to think in almost zero gravity on the Moon, that initial jump when the ascent engine fired would be something!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, maw lod qan said:

Yes, incredible image from long ago!

Thanks for posting the link.

Is it just me, or does the one side of the LM look pretty beat up?

I have to think in almost zero gravity on the Moon, that initial jump when the ascent engine fired would be something!

It is not just you - there is some damage to the outer cladding of the LM in that photo. I need to try and find out a bit more about how that came about.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I love these two, and enjoy seeing them at different illuminations as they can look very different (as does every lunar feature I guess!) They certainly have been catching my eye the last few nights 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
3 minutes ago, Stu said:

I love these two, and enjoy seeing them at different illuminations as they can look very different (as does every lunar feature I guess!) They certainly have been catching my eye the last few nights 

Should be nicely illuminated tonight as well :icon_biggrin:

Forecast is clear here until around 1:00 am I think.

Here is an Apollo 11 photo of the pair:

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f7/AS11-42-6305_Messier_and_Messier_A_craters%2C_Moon.jpg/800px-AS11-42-6305_Messier_and_Messier_A_craters%2C_Moon.jpg

 

Edited by John
  • Like 2
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/02/2021 at 00:22, John said:

I've been observing the moon tonight, like many of us I expect.

The craters Messier and Messier A, with the distinctive comet-type rays extending from the latter, are nicely on show in the Mare Fecunditatis and will be for the next couple of days, clouds allowing. Well worth a look though any telescope.

While finding out more about this interesting pair of craters I came across this fascinating photo in the Internet Archive. It shows the Apollo 16 Lunar Module "Orion" in lunar orbit while it is being inspected from the Command Service Module "Casper", the photo being taken from the latter craft of course. And in the background, on the lunar surface are the craters Messier A and Messier. Not an image that I've seen before.

You can click on the image to see it at a much larger scale and very impressive it is :smiley:

https://archive.org/details/as16-122-19533

What an incredible view, not seen it before thank you for sharing John.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I find it difficult to visualise how these were formed, not to mention the ejecta patterns: I've read about possibly a low angle impact & a ricochet. 

Anyone have a link to a video or something which does a good job of illustrating how they may have formed?? I'd be really interested to see it! :)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, niallk said:

I find it difficult to visualise how these were formed, not to mention the ejecta patterns: I've read about possibly a low angle impact & a ricochet. 

Anyone have a link to a video or something which does a good job of illustrating how they may have formed?? I'd be really interested to see it! :)

This interpretation is 10 years old so thinking might have moved on:

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Stu said:

Cloudy here now :( 

Well it looked OK here earlier but went downhill quite fast - about as long as it took the 130 triplet to cool down :rolleyes2:

Still, I've had quit a few nights in a row when I've been able to observe so a break won't do any harm.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Bad luck John. Was same here: all ready to go, then heavy cloud at dusk. Was hoping for the fifth night in a row.

Still, a night in admiring the Taks is not too much of a hardship ūüėä

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, John said:

This interpretation is 10 years old so thinking might have moved on:

 

Thanks for going to the trouble of posting this @John- exactly what I was hoping for!  I didn't turn it up with a search.

It only enhances the intrigue - they really are a spectacular sight.  I wonder if anyone has ever reproduced a pattern like this in computer simulation or using the likes of the (Nasa/JPL?) 'high velocity projectile gun' you sometimes see featured in documentaries.

How wonderful it is to be able to see such sights with modest equipment all from one's back garden! ;)

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

√ó
√ó
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.