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Upgrade to TS Optics Photoline 115mm APO


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1 minute ago, Louis D said:

I'm picturing $800+ APOs sent from Europe to the US as tube, lens cell, and focuser all separately on different days to legitimately keep the cost below $800 per individual per day (the letter of the law here).  Some minor assembly required.

Well its standard approach here as well, issue is with lenses. LZOS lens cell for a 130 mm/F6 is retail around £3800. Don't know how thats going to get thru, one part of the triplet at a time? 🤣

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I agree, the 115 F/7 triplet has a very good reputation. I have been shopping for a refactor recently as well and my top contenders were the 115 f/7 triplet and the 125 f/7.8 doublet. I took the doubl

Or check with Rupert at Astrograph to see what the availability is. http://astrograph.net/epages/www_astrograph_net.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/www_astrograph_net/Products/AGTEC115-695

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2 hours ago, Deadlake said:

Well its standard approach here as well, issue is with lenses. LZOS lens cell for a 130 mm/F6 is retail around £3800. Don't know how thats going to get thru, one part of the triplet at a time? 🤣

I never claimed it would work in all situations.

The law of unintended consequences comes to mind about now.  Back in the 80s or 90s, Congress enacted a luxury tax on all yachts sold by American companies to "stick it" to the wealthy.  This had the unintended consequence of putting thousands of American yacht makers out of business (including my cousin in New Jersey) because the wealthy simply bought foreign made yachts and registered them overseas before bringing them back to US marinas.  Needless to say, that stupid law was repealed after about 15 years, but the damage had already been done.  The US yacht building industry has never really recovered.

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58 minutes ago, Louis D said:

I never claimed it would work in all situations.

The law of intended consequences comes to mind about now.  Back in the 80s or 90s, Congress enacted a luxury tax on all yachts sold by American companies to "stick it" to the wealthy.  This had the unintended consequence of putting thousands of American yacht makers out of business (including my cousin in New Jersey) because the wealthy simply bought foreign made yachts and registered them overseas before bringing them back to US marinas.  Needless to say, that stupid law was repealed after about 15 years, but the damage had already been done.  The US yacht building industry has never really recovered.

I was just imagining the lengths people go too.... 

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1 hour ago, Deadlake said:

I was just imagining the lengths people go too.... 

Found it.  The 10% luxury tax was enacted in November 1991 and the yacht part was repealed in August 1993.  The car part wasn't repealed until 2002.

Imagine buying a $3,000,000 boat, only to have to pay another $300,000 just because of where you bought it.  It was probably cheaper in the 90s to buy a yacht anywhere else than the US, and this just sealed the deal to buy elsewhere.  As long as you didn't flag it in the US, there wasn't any way to compel an owner to pay the tax avoided.  The wealthy didn't get that way by beings stupid with their money.  Ever notice real estate developers (like a certain orange one) put up very little of their own money?  Instead, they rely on "partners", "investors", and bank loans secured by the property involved to finance their deals.  This greatly limits their downside exposure in case of bankruptcy.

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