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Getting a DSLR off the Dole - Beginner has a go at Baader Hyperion Eyepiece Projection


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My objectives on getting a new Skymax 127 were purely visual observing having parked imaging for a far-off time when I have time on my hands but, on taking delivery of a Baader Hyperion 8-24mm Zoom and fixed Hyperion 24mm 68 degree, I noticed a photo on the box and was intrigued..

My DSLR hardly gets an outing these days with an iPhone camera always on hand but I thought it has to be worth a go so I ordered a Baader M43-T2 thread ring and a Nikon T ring to connect it all together, perhaps this could be quick and dirty way of getting into basic imaging at low cost. It all connects incredibly simply in seconds and although I'm only using the supplied SW plastic-bodied diagonal feels nice and secure when its on the 'scope.

It makes quite a chunky load on the little AZ GTi mount but with the Vixen bar at its extreme balance point the mount performs fine at what I reckon is the very top end of its published 5KG payload. 

Initially I just wanted to establish if there's a decently bright and focusable image that makes it to the CCD & given the absence of stars due to current weather and this being a bit of an operation to put together, a daylight test seemed a good idea.  I have a very handy church spire about 500m away (about the maximum possible distance from a church in Winchester) and poking it all out of an upper storey window in failing light on an extremely windy Saturday I captured the orb below on a  2.5 s exposure - (distance view included for scale, the spire is centre frame partially in the trees). 

Verdict: focussing is tricky, as you can see, but on the Skymax 127 there's definitely plenty of leeway either side with the focuser which answered my initial exam question, it just takes some focus to focus!

I've ordered the Baader heavy duty quick release system pictured on the box which should make this much safer and more practical  in the dark and cold, although it does make this not quite the bargain-basement option it is with just the 2 rings.

Given the light & time limitations of the test Id say its definitely worth trying on nighttime targets, if the clouds ever clear...

Will post any results up here but this looks like a really promising way of resurrecting a Nikon D90 that has been on the dole for a while (it shoots RAW video too!)

Any hints, tips or suitable targets appreciated!

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Edited by SuburbanMak
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  • SuburbanMak changed the title to Getting a DSLR off the Dole - Beginner has a go at Baader Hyperion Eyepiece Projection

I would start off by going for prime focus photography to start with, you dont need the diagonal as the camera and T adapter should screw directly to the scopes visual back.

Alan

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  • 3 weeks later...

After enjoying fainter things over the new moon, I finally had a quick play with the Baader projection ring - these are taken with a 24mm 68degree fixed Baader Hyperion and a Nikon D90. I would say promising & worth a longer session.  

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    • By SuburbanMak
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    • By SuburbanMak
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      36 Million light years though, a new personal space-travel record
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      Starting to enjoy galaxy hunting for its own sake but for sheer beauty the binoculars had it tonight. A great couple of hours that left my mind in time & space for a long while after I got back. 
      M78: 

       
      Leo Triplet: 
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By SuburbanMak
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      As I walked back at frosted midnight all was silent, the line of Orion's belt was setting, a couple of degrees above the rooftops and the cloud was closing in from the East. 
       
       
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