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What to try next, suggestions please.


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New to this so I'm wondering what to try next. I don't have a good view of the west.

I have imaged .... The Orion Nebula.... The Andromeda Galaxy ... The Pleiades ..... and Bode's/Cigar Galaxy . and I am pleased with the results so far, but I have a lot to learn.

Looks like a clear night tonight so recommendations please, my location is Middle England, and my set up is below.

AZ-GTI in Az mode (good for up to 40 seconds)

Canon 80D and either 70-200mm f2.8 lens .. or 150-600mm f5-6.3.

some light pollution .. Bortle 5

My latest image (last night)

500227311_AndromedaGalaxy4web.jpg.1a388942355f2dd03e8ac5c1793ae309.jpg

Thanks in advance. 

 

 

Edited by shropshire lad
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In answer to your first question, I would say that they are one of the easier targets to capture, but can be one of the harder to process due to the brightness of the star(s) in the region.  

The Horsehead and Flame are right next to each other and the entire thing can be imaged with with anything up to 700mm, although I personally think somewhere between 350mm - 480mm can frame the whole thing nicely.  What I don't know is whether your DSLR is modified.  The hydrogen gas around the horsehead is beautiful if it can be captured.  

 

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2 hours ago, shropshire lad said:

Can these be imaged together.?

 

Depends on the FoV (500mm focal length on the one below) but they are right next too each other...easy is a relative term, I was capturing it with 5 minute subs with a DSLR no problem but it does have some tricky things to process i.e. some very very bright stars...all in all good fun, plus it's one of my favourite images as a kid so I enjoyed it a lot because of that.

horse alt.jpg

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2 hours ago, Snoani said:

In answer to your first question, I would say that they are one of the easier targets to capture, but can be one of the harder to process due to the brightness of the star(s) in the region.  

The Horsehead and Flame are right next to each other and the entire thing can be imaged with with anything up to 700mm, although I personally think somewhere between 350mm - 480mm can frame the whole thing nicely.  What I don't know is whether your DSLR is modified.  The hydrogen gas around the horsehead is beautiful if it can be captured.  

 

No my camera is not modified.

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1 hour ago, smashing said:

Depends on the FoV (500mm focal length on the one below) but they are right next too each other...easy is a relative term, I was capturing it with 5 minute subs with a DSLR no problem but it does have some tricky things to process i.e. some very very bright stars...all in all good fun, plus it's one of my favourite images as a kid so I enjoyed it a lot because of that.

horse alt.jpg

Wow, fantastic image ..... I could go up to 500mm and probably 30 second exposures, will have to do a test shot and see (if the clouds move out of the way).

 

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2 hours ago, shropshire lad said:

Wow, fantastic image ..... I could go up to 500mm and probably 30 second exposures, will have to do a test shot and see (if the clouds move out of the way).

 

The flame nebula is (well I found anyway) pretty bright...take as many as possible and see what you get :)

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