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My image generating productivity has been significantly decreased by the poor UK weather in recent months. Even with an automated observatory, my image capturing has been moving at a glacial rate. However, here’s the latest image to finally emerge from my set up – NGC 7497 :happy11:

NGC 7497 is a spiral galaxy in the Pegasus constellation, approximately 60 million light years distant with a disc size of approximately 91000 light years.  The galaxy shows signs of warping indicating past interactions. You can (just) make out some HII regions in the image below that appear to be semi-randomly positioned within the galaxy.

The galaxy is viewed away from the plane of our own galaxy, through a mass of dust and gas known as Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN), which resides in our own galaxy and is approximately 600 light years distant. The stars within our galaxy act together in an integrated fashion to faintly illuminate the gas, hence the name.

In 1985, the astronomers Magnani, Blitz and Munday (MBM), decided to catalogue the various IFNs and the one shown is known as MBM 54.

The image also features many stars and a several background galaxies. Some of the stars are closer to Earth than MBM 54 and appear sharp and distinct (eg the bright blue star at the top, middle) and some are more distant.  The more distant objects will therefore appear fuzzy if they are viewed though dust and nebulosity.

The LRGB image below represents just under 16 hours integration time and was taken with my Esprit 150. 

Alan

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LIGHTS: L:37, R:20, G:20, B:18 x 600s, DARKS:30, BIAS:100, FLATS:40 all at -20C.  

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Crikey, that is amazing.  I know there are some dark sky areas in your neck of the woods but didn't know they were this good.  Beautifully processed as well.

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On 20/01/2021 at 11:44, Richie092 said:

Well that was definitely worth waiting for!

Thanks :hello: - I don't think I could have done this without an automated set up.

20 hours ago, MartinB said:

Crikey, that is amazing.  I know there are some dark sky areas in your neck of the woods but didn't know they were this good.  Beautifully processed as well.

Thanks Martin ! I'm fortunate to live at a location which (by UK standards) has very good dark skies. I'm also at the top of a hill which helps, although it does get rather windy at times.

Edited by alan4908
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    • By alan4908
      NGC 7497 is a spiral galaxy in the Pegasus constellation, approximately 60 million light years distant with a disc size of approximately 91000 light years.  The galaxy shows signs of warping indicating past interactions. You can (just) make out some HII regions in the image below that appear to be semi-randomly positioned within the galaxy. The galaxy is viewed away from the plane of our own galaxy, through a mass of dust and gas known as Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN), which resides in our own galaxy and is approximately 600 light years distant. The stars within our galaxy act together in an integrated fashion to faintly illuminate the gas, hence the name. In 1985, the astronomers Magnani, Blitz and Munday (MBM), decided to catalogue the various IFNs and the one shown is known as MBM 54.The image also features many stars and a several background galaxies. Some of the stars are closer to Earth than MBM 54 and appear sharp and distinct (eg the bright blue star at the top, middle) and some are more distant.  The more distant objects will therefore appear fuzzy if they are viewed though dust and nebulosity. The LRGB image below represents just under 16 hours integration time and was taken with my Esprit 150. 
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