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Hello

I am new to astronomy, and recently purchased a Celestron Starsense Explorer LT 114AZ, and just for a start, I used the finderscope to locate exactly a random star, and I looked through the eyepiece and just saw a blurry white image. I was using a 25mm eyepiece lens, and then decided to put on the 2x Barlow lens with the 25mm lens, and nothing changed. Is this normal? What should I do to improve?

Thanks.

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29 minutes ago, BenR said:

Hello

I am new to astronomy, and recently purchased a Celestron Starsense Explorer LT 114AZ, and just for a start, I used the finderscope to locate exactly a random star, and I looked through the eyepiece and just saw a blurry white image. I was using a 25mm eyepiece lens, and then decided to put on the 2x Barlow lens with the 25mm lens, and nothing changed. Is this normal? What should I do to improve?

Thanks.

Hello and welcome to SGL. Did you adjust the focussing (turning the knurled wheels on the focuser) ?

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Welcome! Sorry to hear you are having issues as the poster above suggests have you tried refocusing the telescope this would be done using the large black knob underneath where the eyepeice is located (looking at the picture of that telescope). You will also have to refocus once you put in a barlow (or take it out) as it alters the magnification of the telescope. I find the focus can be trickier when you have have the more magnified view just have to go slowly with the knob.

Edited by wibblefish
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Hello, and welcome to the forum.

There are a number of reasons why an image might be "blurry", but it's hard to tell without seeing what you see.
But before we start doubting the alignment or manufacturing of the scope, the most likely cause is incorrect focusing as stated above.

Have you tried using the telescope in daylight first? If not, it might help, if you're new to the hobby. Try to focus on a distant object with some good detail, like the branches of a tree on the horizon. Just use the 25mm lens, with no barlow - or erector, if it came with one - so the view will be upside down. Get used to how the controls work. It's also a good opportunity to align the red dot finder.

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3 hours ago, Cornelius Varley said:

Hello and welcome to SGL. Did you adjust the focussing (turning the knurled wheels on the focuser) ?

Yes, all I saw were smaller white dots. like when you look at the sky with naked-eye

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3 hours ago, wibblefish said:

Welcome! Sorry to hear you are having issues as the poster above suggests have you tried refocusing the telescope this would be done using the large black knob underneath where the eyepeice is located (looking at the picture of that telescope). You will also have to refocus once you put in a barlow (or take it out) as it alters the magnification of the telescope. I find the focus can be trickier when you have have the more magnified view just have to go slowly with the knob.

Yes, all I saw were smaller white dots. like when you look at the sky with naked-eye

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Just now, BenR said:

Yes, all I saw were smaller white dots. like when you look at the sky with naked-eye

Stars will always be small white dots. The stars are so far away that even the most powerful telescopes see them as dots.. 

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1 minute ago, BenR said:

Yes, all I saw were smaller white dots. like when you look at the sky with naked-eye

This is exactly how any stars (note: stars, not planets) would look like in a telescope.

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3 hours ago, Zermelo said:

Hello, and welcome to the forum.

There are a number of reasons why an image might be "blurry", but it's hard to tell without seeing what you see.
But before we start doubting the alignment or manufacturing of the scope, the most likely cause is incorrect focusing as stated above.

Have you tried using the telescope in daylight first? If not, it might help, if you're new to the hobby. Try to focus on a distant object with some good detail, like the branches of a tree on the horizon. Just use the 25mm lens, with no barlow - or erector, if it came with one - so the view will be upside down. Get used to how the controls work. It's also a good opportunity to align the red dot finder.

Ok, ill try it. I'm waiting on the Moon to be in range of sight... so when I can actually see the moon, I will start to have a play around with the telescope, to get used to it.

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2 minutes ago, Cornelius Varley said:

Stars will always be small white dots. The stars are so far away that even the most powerful telescopes see them as dots.. 

Ok, thank you. I thought this would be the case, but I wanted to be sure from people with experience.

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2 minutes ago, KP82 said:

This is exactly how any stars (note: stars, not planets) would look like in a telescope.

Yes, I thought that. just needed extra confirmation so that I know there is nothing wrong with the telescope.

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1 hour ago, BenR said:

Yes, all I saw were smaller white dots. like when you look at the sky with naked-eye

Yup that is correct 👍 This thread might help with what to expect but feel free to ask if you are unsure, this community is very helpful!

 

Edited by wibblefish
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