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Would this be good for powering my HEQ5?


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23 hours ago, AlanP_ said:

Ah ok, thanks for pointing that out.

So if I bought that jump starter, I could power my laptop using that convertor you linked, and then connect the other 12V outlet to my Mount. Then if I needed the USB ports I could buy a hub and connect it to the power starter too. Would that work ok? 

Just had a look, that holder is out of stock unfortunately! 

Really appreciate your help with this, i'd be lost otherwise :D 

It seems the biggest drain / power requirement is to permanently run your laptop. If you are not guiding what are you using it for ?

Cheers

 

 

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My take on the battery box. Added 4 two pole Aviation sockets which is what I use for 12V connectors. Also added switches to control each output and a volt & Ammeter. Only mistake I ha

THIS is the box I used. It is not designated as a dry box but really is more than good enough to keep dew off things for a night and together with the waterproof extension would be more than safe.

It seems the biggest drain / power requirement is to permanently run your laptop. If you are not guiding what are you using it for ? Cheers    

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3 minutes ago, Coriorda said:

It seems the biggest drain / power requirement is to permanently run your laptop. If you are not guiding what are you using it for ?

Cheers

 

 

I ended up buying an outdoor extension lead. One to power my mount, and the other to power my laptop. The mount will be connected to my laptop to control slewing along with my camera. I will be adding guiding in the future however!

Actually, your comment just got me thinking. I will be using a dummy battery pack for my canon, but what do I need to connect my laptop to my camera to take photos?

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46 minutes ago, AlanP_ said:

I ended up buying an outdoor extension lead. One to power my mount, and the other to power my laptop. The mount will be connected to my laptop to control slewing along with my camera. I will be adding guiding in the future however!

Actually, your comment just got me thinking. I will be using a dummy battery pack for my canon, but what do I need to connect my laptop to my camera to take photos?

The short answer is you don't.

But, eventually you may want to start running some sort of sequence software.

Now I have only been into Astrophotgraphy just over a couple of years and when I started I thought I will never manage this. I could not believe how much software was available for both controlling your equipment and processing the images you take.
The sequence software that controls your equipment is somewhat mind blowing to begin with, most can control of your equipment if you want - mount, camera, focusser, filter wheel, camera rotator, even your observatory dome if you had one and are capable of being setup at start of night on one target take a number of photos all at same or different exposures, or different filters if you have a filter wheel, they can be programmed to re-focus every so often (if you have a focusser) , then when that target goes out of sight of line it can slew to another target and do the same again on that target and finally if you have an observatory dome they can shut everything down, send scope to a park position and shut the dome up. You can even get rain and cloud detectors (honestly cloud detectors) and if it is going to rain shut everything up safe in your observatory.

Now although I would love the observatory I am nowhere near that but I do use some of this software.

Even more amazing is some of this amazing software is free, or certainly pretty cheap.

Now to start with you certainly do not need to be doing all that if you had the gear it is all just too much  to start with. Important thing is to walk before you run and get some sort of images taken.
But you may want to start off with small steps. When I started with a DSLR I used APT which is a very good sequence software to control your mount and even can control your DSLR. In fact it works very well with DSLR's.
Astro Photography Tool
There used to be a totally free version that really had almost nothing lacking from the paid version.
It is very easy to use with great help files and manual.
I loved it and actually paid for the full version after a few months of the free version more because I thought the guy that wrote the software (and maintained it) deserved it. It was still cheap, less than £20 I think, and he was good at answering your questions if you needed help.

So you may want to take a look as it may help you a lot in the future.
Like I say not absolutely necessary but APT would be a good step into automating your rig.

It does complicate things a bit as you would need some other files and bits of software (ASCOM) which has the drivers to control your mount and camera etc. But once I had learned to use it I found it invaluable for finding my  targets accurately.
Once set up properly you can slew to a target, selected in APT not your mount handset,  but quite often you are not quite on that target the first time you slew from having polar aligned, you can then take a short picture and even though the DSO may not be in the picture because you are so far out, you can do something called plate solving and after a few seconds the program tells you how far you are away from the target and will then slew to the correct position. That really is invaluable when taking further pictures of the same target on another night and get the framing exactly the same so when you process all images together they all line up almost perfectly.

Sorry if this is all too much info to take in to begin with, I know it was for me and I had many frustrating nights getting it all to work but when it does it is amazing.
So do not worry about it for now start off simple to begin with you cannot possible do all of this to begin with but just thought I would let you know what is possible, and on a cold night the ability to take images and see on the computer screen the image quality and the framing as you take them, from inside as well if you want, really helps you than messing about looking at the DSLR readout in cold weather. 

Also on feint DSO's you will not see anything but start on the DSLR readout but in something like APT you can do what we call stretching the picture automatically, which basically brightens any dim object so you can see it.

Sorry I have rambled on too long now.

Steve

 

Edited by teoria_del_big_bang
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4 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

The short answer is you don't.

But, eventually you may want to start running some sort of sequence software.

Now I have only been into Astrophotgraphy just over a couple of years and when I started I thought I will never manage this. I could not believe how much software was available for both controlling your equipment and processing the images you take.
The sequence software that controls your equipment is somewhat mind blowing to begin with, most can control of your equipment if you want - mount, camera, focusser, filter wheel, camera rotator, even your observatory dome if you had one and are capable of being setup at start of night on one target take a number of photos all at same or different exposures, or different filters if you have a filter wheel, they can be programmed to re-focus every so often (if you have a focusser) , then when that target goes out of sight of line it can slew to another target and do the same again on that target and finally if you have an observatory dome they can shut everything down, send scope to a park position and shut the dome up. You can even get rain and cloud detectors (honestly cloud detectors) and if it is going to rain shut everything up safe in your observatory.

Now although I would love the observatory I am nowhere near that but I do use some of this software.

Even more amazing is some of this amazing software is free, or certainly pretty cheap.

Now to start with you certainly do not need to be doing all that if you had the gear it is all just too much  to start with. Important thing is to walk before you run and get some sort of images taken.
But you may want to start off with small steps. When I started with a DSLR I used APT which is a very good sequence software to control your mount and even can control your DSLR. In fact it works very well with DSLR's.
Astro Photography Tool
There used to be a totally free version that really had almost nothing lacking from the paid version.
It is very easy to use with great help files and manual.
I loved it and actually paid for the full version after a few months of the free version more because I thought the guy that wrote the software (and maintained it) deserved it. It was still cheap, less than £20 I think, and he was good at answering your questions if you needed help.

So you may want to take a look as it may help you a lot in the future.
Like I say not absolutely necessary but APT would be a good step into automating your rig.

It does complicate things a but as you would need some other files and bits of software (ASCOM) which has the drivers to control your mount and camera etc. But once I had learned to use it I found it invaluable for finding my articuat targets.
Once set up properly you can slew to a target, selected in APT not your mount handset,  but quite often you are not quite on that target the first time you slew from having polar aligned, you can then take a short picture and even though the DSO may not be in the picture because you are so far out, you can do something called plate solving and after a few seconds the program tells you how far you are away from the target and will then slew to the correct position. That really is invaluable when taking further pictures of the same target on another night and get the framing exactly the same so when you process all images together they all line up almost perfectly.

Sorry if this is all too much info to take in to begin with, I know it was for me and I had many frustrating nights getting it all to work but when it does it is amazing.
So do not worry about it for now start off simple to begin with you cannot possible do all of this to begin with but just thought I would let you know what is possible, and on a cold night the ability to take images and see on the computer screen the image quality and the framing as you take them, from inside as well if you want, really helps you than messing about looking at the DSLR readout in cold weather. 

Also on feint DSO's you will not see anything but start on the DSLR readout but in something like APT you can do what we call stretching the picture automatically, which basically brightens any dim object so you can see it.

Sorry I have rambled on too long now.

Steve

 

No need to apologise! Thats an invaluable piece of information and one that i'll definitely come back to once I have all of my equipment set up.

I knew of APT and it was the piece of software I was actually going to use once I have everything. It's very reasonably priced too so I have no issue paying for it. I did not realise the shear amount of things it can do though. Thats amazing! I think I will have to look up some tutorials or play around with it at least so i'm not totally stunned by it. 

So how does APT take photos if its not directly connected to the camera? 

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Just now, AlanP_ said:

No need to apologise! Thats an invaluable piece of information and one that i'll definitely come back to once I have all of my equipment set up.

I knew of APT and it was the piece of software I was actually going to use once I have everything. It's very reasonably priced too so I have no issue paying for it. I did not realise the shear amount of things it can do though. Thats amazing! I think I will have to look up some tutorials or play around with it at least so i'm not totally stunned by it. 

So how does APT take photos if its not directly connected to the camera? 

Sorry, I guess it may depend on whether yo can connect your camera to a laptop via usb. Before getting into AstroPhotography I had never owned a DSLR so no idea if all can but I suspect they can to make it easy to download your pictures.
But assuming it can then APT can just detect your camera and take pictures, adjust the settings, you really do not need to touch your camera at all.

I don't use APT now but not because the software is not great. And, maybe APT doesn;t control domes I can;t remember c=but some other software does, and for you that doesn't matter (Yet).

If you also load up Stellarium you can even select the target in stellarium and APT will talk to Stellarium and go to the target you have selected, you can take a picture and in stellarium it sows where your scope is actually pointing (which more often than not is not quite whre you wanted it) and then give you the option to go to the target properly.

It is not all a matter of just load APT and Stellarium and away you go mind, there are other bits of software to load as well (free) and you may well need help to get it all working, I certainly did and not even sure of everything I did now, but  when you get it working it is such a big help it really is worth it.

Steve

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7 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Sorry, I guess it may depend on whether yo can connect your camera to a laptop via usb. Before getting into AstroPhotography I had never owned a DSLR so no idea if all can but I suspect they can to make it easy to download your pictures.
But assuming it can then APT can just detect your camera and take pictures, adjust the settings, you really do not need to touch your camera at all.

I don't use APT now but not because the software is not great. And, maybe APT doesn;t control domes I can;t remember c=but some other software does, and for you that doesn't matter (Yet).

If you also load up Stellarium you can even select the target in stellarium and APT will talk to Stellarium and go to the target you have selected, you can take a picture and in stellarium it sows where your scope is actually pointing (which more often than not is not quite whre you wanted it) and then give you the option to go to the target properly.

It is not all a matter of just load APT and Stellarium and away you go mind, there are other bits of software to load as well (free) and you may well need help to get it all working, I certainly did and not even sure of everything I did now, but  when you get it working it is such a big help it really is worth it.

Steve

Ah ok, I see. So if I got something like this would it allow me to take photos with the camera from ATP or similar? Sorry, these questions probably seem stupid. I've looked at guides before but nobody went into a significant amount of detail with setting up, so there are a tonne of grey areas for me.

Thats cool, I actually use stellarium sometimes to just have a browse! 

Edited by AlanP_
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Just to add that when I started I had searched on line a bit and new some software was out there for the ameteur astronomer but until I actually started with imaging had no idea how powerful any of this was at all.

I now use KStars and INDI software which does basically the same as APT but is all on a Raspberry Pi computer that you can buy for around £50 and is the size of those big boxes of matches you get and sits on my mount. I then control it via wi fif from inside the house either via my phone (although the screen is too small for my aging eyes) or my laptop. Unbelievable.

Steve

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2 minutes ago, AlanP_ said:

Ah ok, I see. So if I got something like this would it allow me to take photos with the camera from ATP or similar? Sorry, these questions probably seem stupid. I've looked at guides before but nobody went into a significant amount of detail with setting up, so there are a tonne of grey areas for me.

Thats cool, I actually use stellarium sometimes to just have a browse! 

Yes

My shortest reply yet Ha Ha 🙂 

Steve

Edited by teoria_del_big_bang
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17 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Just to add that when I started I had searched on line a bit and new some software was out there for the ameteur astronomer but until I actually started with imaging had no idea how powerful any of this was at all.

I now use KStars and INDI software which does basically the same as APT but is all on a Raspberry Pi computer that you can buy for around £50 and is the size of those big boxes of matches you get and sits on my mount. I then control it via wi fif from inside the house either via my phone (although the screen is too small for my aging eyes) or my laptop. Unbelievable.

Steve

Thats something I may use down the line! I've played around with PI's before. It's amazing some of the things that they can do.

16 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Yes

My shortest reply yet Ha Ha 🙂 

Steve

Haha, you deserve to give your fingers a break after all the help you've given me! Just to clarify, are you saying yes to that cable allowing me to take photos with APT?

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Don't worry was the same for me and until you set up and connect everything it does not become clear.

Although it sounds counter-productive I really recommend that you set yourself up for many nights that maybe you don't even get a good image but just get your equipment working and learn how to sew to a target, platesolve, re-adjust the mount position and then start a camera sequence off.
Once it all works and becomes 2nd nature you then can but up and running in no time and you get most of the the valuable clear night taking proper images.

Quite often now if the skies are only partially clear I do not bother setting up (maybe rightly or wrong) but certainly in the early days any time at all I could get with any stars visible, so long as I could see polaris to polar align then I gave it a go, not to get any decent images because too cloudy, but just to learn the program and tweak in some settings, or get the software working.

It payed dividends in the end when the good clear nights came.

Also do not get too worried about getting guiding up and running for a while.
Yes it certainly helps to get longer exposures and maybe better images of the feinter stuff, but so long as you are polar aligned well then with a HEQ5 you should be able to get at least 2 to 3 minute exposures without noticeable star trailing , and thats all you need with a DSLR (especially one that is astro modified). The longer 5 to 10 minutes are really only needed for dedicated mono astro cameras using narrow band filters that only let a very small bandwith of light pass. I am not saying 5 minutes exposure will not help with broadband DSLR imaging, especially on some feinter DSO's but to start with there are plenty of targets you do not need that.

Most start with Orion nebula, if it is visible. It is bright and is a beautiful sight. Even 30 seconds on this gives reasonable images. 

Do you have any books on the subject yet ?
I really would say to get "Every Photon Counts", if that's the only book you get.  It is actually in very plain language understandable by all and covers all basics and also introduces you to the processing side which is a whole subject on its own.

I do not know if you have looked into the processing, which stacks all your images, adds the colour by debayering them (you need to take images in RAW data form which will look black & white but all the info is there to make them colour with the imaging software) and will also bring out the feint nebulas by what is called stretching the image. 
To start with a real easy bit of software that works well is "Nebulosity". it is not free but not expensive. I would not say it is the best but perfectly adequate for DSLR images and the best of all it is real easy to use and again loads of tutorials on it.

Steve

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5 minutes ago, AlanP_ said:

Thats something I may use down the line! I've played around with PI's before. It's amazing some of the things that they can do.

Haha, you deserve to give your fingers a break after all the help you've given me! Just to clarify, are you saying yes to that cable allowing me to take photos with APT?

Yes it looks correct cable, it certainly is just a usb cable with a normal plug one end and a small one the other that plugs into the camera.

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7 minutes ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

Don't worry was the same for me and until you set up and connect everything it does not become clear.

Although it sounds counter-productive I really recommend that you set yourself up for many nights that maybe you don't even get a good image but just get your equipment working and learn how to sew to a target, platesolve, re-adjust the mount position and then start a camera sequence off.
Once it all works and becomes 2nd nature you then can but up and running in no time and you get most of the the valuable clear night taking proper images.

Quite often now if the skies are only partially clear I do not bother setting up (maybe rightly or wrong) but certainly in the early days any time at all I could get with any stars visible, so long as I could see polaris to polar align then I gave it a go, not to get any decent images because too cloudy, but just to learn the program and tweak in some settings, or get the software working.

It payed dividends in the end when the good clear nights came.

Also do not get too worried about getting guiding up and running for a while.
Yes it certainly helps to get longer exposures and maybe better images of the feinter stuff, but so long as you are polar aligned well then with a HEQ5 you should be able to get at least 2 to 3 minute exposures without noticeable star trailing , and thats all you need with a DSLR (especially one that is astro modified). The longer 5 to 10 minutes are really only needed for dedicated mono astro cameras using narrow band filters that only let a very small bandwith of light pass. I am not saying 5 minutes exposure will not help with broadband DSLR imaging, especially on some feinter DSO's but to start with there are plenty of targets you do not need that.

Most start with Orion nebula, if it is visible. It is bright and is a beautiful sight. Even 30 seconds on this gives reasonable images. 

Do you have any books on the subject yet ?
I really would say to get "Every Photon Counts", if that's the only book you get.  It is actually in very plain language understandable by all and covers all basics and also introduces you to the processing side which is a whole subject on its own.

I do not know if you have looked into the processing, which stacks all your images, adds the colour by debayering them (you need to take images in RAW data form which will look black & white but all the info is there to make them colour with the imaging software) and will also bring out the feint nebulas by what is called stretching the image. 
To start with a real easy bit of software that works well is "Nebulosity". it is not free but not expensive. I would not say it is the best but perfectly adequate for DSLR images and the best of all it is real easy to use and again loads of tutorials on it.

Steve

Yeah definitely, I think thats a good shout. The past week here where I am it has been crystal clear all throughout the night. I just hope it continues for when I get my setup! I will certainly go out and test it though even if its mostly cloudy out. 

I'll avoid using any guiding or even looking into it for a few months until i'm comfortable with what I have now. Orion and Andromeda are quite high at the minute so I think they will be my first targets. 

I dont have any books yet, but i'm working on it ;) 

 image.thumb.png.9a2012566581ae632d2b21ac8eeb92ea.png

I've played around with processing before for a milkyway shot but that was around two years ago.

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3 minutes ago, AlanP_ said:

Yeah definitely, I think thats a good shout. The past week here where I am it has been crystal clear all throughout the night. I just hope it continues for when I get my setup! I will certainly go out and test it though even if its mostly cloudy out. 

I'll avoid using any guiding or even looking into it for a few months until i'm comfortable with what I have now. Orion and Andromeda are quite high at the minute so I think they will be my first targets. 

I dont have any books yet, but i'm working on it ;) 

 image.thumb.png.9a2012566581ae632d2b21ac8eeb92ea.png

I've played around with processing before for a milkyway shot but that was around two years ago.

It might even be worth posting in wanted on SGL as most imagers get this book and may be ready to part with it to save a euro or two. I have it but not sure I want to part with it yet.

Steve

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Just now, teoria_del_big_bang said:

It might even be worth posting in wanted on SGL as most imagers get this book and may be ready to part with it to save a euro or two. I have it but not sure I want to part with it yet.

Steve

Ah, I dont think it would be worth it. By the time delivery comes into play it would probably be the same price and im ordering off FLO anyways :) Thanks for the suggestion though!

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7 hours ago, AlanP_ said:

In the video of him doing the astromod, he installed an Astronomic clear glass after he removed the IR filter. I wasn't aware I needed to buy that clear glass filter. I wonder is it needed or was that for something else. I may add that to the other thread where I was talking about this. 

Yeah, maybe i'll send them an email. FLO have been very helpful with giving me advice in the past when enquiring :) 

The clear glass is (I'm 99% sure) just there to protect the sensor as it will be open to dust etc & it'll also be easily damaged.

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44 minutes ago, nephilim said:

The clear glass is (I'm 99% sure) just there to protect the sensor as it will be open to dust etc & it'll also be easily damaged.

As has been mentioned above about getting in practice setting up. I'd also suggest getting setup I'm the daytime aswell a few times.  Having to set up at night with only a red light to guide you (I say red as it will preserve your dark adapted eyes) is a lot more time consuming than you might think to start with. 

In the daytime you can get used to knowing which cable goes where, which USB plugs into which device & which device should be powered up first etc. There's nothing worse than having a clear few hours forecast before clouds are expected to roll in only to waste valuable time in the dark trying to remember how that tangle of cables all comes together, and it always always gets tangled 🙄 

Talking of cables, a lot of people overlook cable management, it's far from the most glamorous side of AP but imo it's a very important one as snagged cables can unplug from USB ports, a slewing scope can pull on them etc. Having good cable management is a good way of avoiding these things. I bought a pack of reusable velcro cable straps & have my cables strapped together in two's & three's & then strapped to my tripod legs but make sure to turn the mount head manually in all directions to make sure these cables are loose enough for the mount to slew without obstruction but not too loose as to hang & become potential hazards.

Little things such as the above can help make your routine slick & free up valuable imaging time. Believe it or not there are plenty of YouTube tutorials on this & I'd recommend having a look at a few.

Steve

Edited by nephilim
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  • 2 weeks later...
On 01/01/2021 at 21:18, SMF said:

Just taken delivery of the box, battery & charger 🙂 

To charge it do you open it up and put the charger on the battery terminals directly, or is it safe to charge via the cigarette lighter socket or the outside ring terminals. I assume these only go through the breakers so unless uni-directional, which I very much doubt, should be olay.

Similar to you I intend to put some better connectors on as I hate those cigarette lighter sockets, too easy to pull out accidently or get bad connections.

Steve

 

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Hi Steve,

I charge the battery connecting directly to the trolling motor posts (the outside ring terminals).

I didn't see a problem and the instructions don't mention it one way or the other.

Been very pleased with it so far and for the cost, after a little DIY, I think it's hard to beat.

The twin USB with the volt meter from amazon is handy. Gives you continuous battery health and is reasonably accurate +/- 0.1A

Very Best

Steve

Unknown.jpeg

Unknown-1.jpeg

Edited by SMF
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9 minutes ago, SMF said:

I charge the battery connecting directly to the trolling motor posts (the outside ring terminals).
I didn't see a problem and the instructions don't mention it one way or the other.
Been very pleased with it so far and for the cost, after a little DIY, I think it's hard to beat.
The twin USB with the volt meter from amazon is handy. Gives you continuous battery health and is reasonably accurate +/- 0.1A

Cheers Oh that looks a great addition.
I also am really pleased bargain for such a profession looking and powerful supply. Many thanks for the heads up and the help 🙂 

Steve

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My take on the battery box.

Added 4 two pole Aviation sockets which is what I use for 12V connectors.
Also added switches to control each output and a volt & Ammeter.

Only mistake I have made (I think) is that the voltmeter/ammeter is where the strop hoes so covers it up.
So I will print a blanking plate and move it somewhere else, another day.

Once again many thanks to @SMF for the info and sorry for just about copying your idea but it is perfect for the job and should power the scope and all its equipment easily for many hours.

1610902110829.thumb.jpg.7aaf43165de7c954e4133048dc08a941.jpg

Steve

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3 hours ago, teoria_del_big_bang said:

My take on the battery box.

That looks great Steve (as does @SMF's version!).  If you're OK with it, can you show a peak under the hood?  

How straightforward is it to wire and physically fit the additional terminals and switches?  I really like your previous box with the Nevada supply in it too and wondered a similar thing about adding the connections to box shell itself.

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54 minutes ago, geeklee said:

That looks great Steve (as does @SMF's version!).  If you're OK with it, can you show a peak under the hood?  

How straightforward is it to wire and physically fit the additional terminals and switches?  I really like your previous box with the Nevada supply in it too and wondered a similar thing about adding the connections to box shell itself.

Yes no problem, I need to re-do it so I can change the position of the voltmeter so will take some shots and do a bit of a diagram. My wiring is not particularly neat so might look a lot more complicated than it actually is. The actual wiring is pretty straight forward and could be simplified if you don;t need 4 outlets but maybe only two.

I will do it sometime this week 🙂 

Steve

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