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Hi,

I have Skytee 2 mount, on which I use the side mount for my 200p and use the top mount for my 127 Mak, sometimes at the same time. (Yes, I got carried away with secondhand bargain madness during the first lockdown ūüėŹ)

What I would like to do is use the top mount to mount my 15x70 binoculars so I can let the family see what I'm looking at without having change the height of eyepieces on the scope or them using steps.

For this I would need a sturdy adaptor which has a dovetail (vixen?) base with the normal screw fit for the tripod mounting bracket between the lenses.

Does such a thing exist? If it does, I haven't been able to find it.

Does anyone know of one?

Thanks

 

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The easiest way is probably to use a dovetail plate with a 1/4" mounting screw (eg the Orion 7388) directly onto the mounting bracket of your binocular. If you can't visualise what I mean, say so (safest to DM to make sure I get it) and I'll rig it and post an image here.

HTH

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2 hours ago, BinocularSky said:

The easiest way is probably to use a dovetail plate with a 1/4" mounting screw (eg the Orion 7388) directly onto the mounting bracket of your binocular. If you can't visualise what I mean, say so (safest to DM to make sure I get it) and I'll rig it and post an image here.

HTH

Thanks for the reply, I know what you mean, I was thinking of that as a work around, I just wondered if anyone made a bespoke item but I guess not that many people have a horizontal mount.

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