Jump to content

740427863_Terminatorchallenge.jpg.2f4cb93182b2ce715fac5aa75b0503c8.jpg

cameras and observatories


astro mick
 Share

Recommended Posts

Does anyone leave their cmos camera permantly attached to their scope,even in winter.

I used to do this with my old ccd,but not sure about cmos.Although i cant see why there would be a difference.Having just got one,i would be interested in comments regarding this.

Have you experienced problems with this,especially say after a heavy dew,and the camera remaining wet for a period of time.

Or should we bring them in and dry out after every use.

Cheers.

Mick.

Edited by astro mick
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you automating the set up as if you are that usually means the camera is 'on' permanently and generating some heat so should keep some dew away.  I think a dehumdifier in an observatory is a must in the UK which would also help.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Mick,

My ZWO ASI1600MM Cool Pro, ZWO ASI174MM and ZWO ASI290MC also live in the observatory all year round (since 2018), the 1600 is permanently installed, while the other two just wander around, but hardly ever leave the observatory (occasionally they spent a few days holiday in the heated garage doing collimation and mirror testing stuff). All cams are disconnected when not in use. The observatory itself is not climate-controlled, during lousy weather conditions the scopes and ASI1600 live under a Geoptik cover together with a 65W Intel NUC pc to keep them warm (less cold is a better description). The other two usually sit somewhere on the dome's ring with a dust-cap on. So far all three live a happy live, no complaints so far and they still look and perform like new.

Nicolàs

Edited by inFINNity Deck
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi guys thanks for this.

The observatory is dry,but when you have a heavy dew on an imaging night, and no wind the next day,all the gear is pretty wet.

I,m wondering if a dew band wrapped around the camera on a low setting would help.

Mick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, astro mick said:

Hi guys thanks for this.

The observatory is dry,but when you have a heavy dew on an imaging night, and no wind the next day,all the gear is pretty wet.

I,m wondering if a dew band wrapped around the camera on a low setting would help.

Mick.

i would suggest a dehumidifier, moisture is the enemy of all electronics and not to forget your wooden construction, very happy with This one

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice dehumidifier,but a bit pricey for me.

These cameras must be built to withstand moisture,as they can become dripping wet on some nights,and there is no warning saying they have to taken back inside and dried out.

People who operate remote telescopes must have cameras attached all the time,but of course they might have a different set-up.

I,m leaning to-wards just leaving the camera attached.

Fingers crossed.

Mick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Obsy is wood and has ventilation so not too bad. The only thing that seems to have been killed by damp over the past few years in my Obsy was a PC, and that was because I shut it down & left it for a year or so. The motherboard had pretty bad corrosion, lasted a few years when left on tho. I have a dehumidifier but don't use it all the time. It's automatically switched on/off when the obsy closes/opens.  Runs on a timer, can set humidity etc.. I usually have it set to run for a couple of hours after close unless the humidity is particularly high and the kits very wet. Got it from these guys.. https://www.dry-it-out.com/dry/observatories.html

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, astro mick said:

Nice dehumidifier,but a bit pricey for me.

These cameras must be built to withstand moisture,as they can become dripping wet on some nights,and there is no warning saying they have to taken back inside and dried out.

People who operate remote telescopes must have cameras attached all the time,but of course they might have a different set-up.

I,m leaning to-wards just leaving the camera attached.

Fingers crossed.

Mick.

A lot of remote observatories are located in dry locations (as high humidity also means cloud and rain) so it's less of an issue for these types of locations.  It is the external electronics you need to think about as well as connectors.  Most CCDs/CMOS are in purged chambers with some manner of reducing any moisture in the chamber (otherwise you get ice on the chip).  You never want any electronics sopping wet (that includes the mount) and you also have to be careful with the telescope as well because of mould or rusting cells etc.

Good dehumidifiers can be expensive but they are still cheaper than replacing the telescope equipment!  Think of it as insurance.  Dew heater bands are possible but is a bit of a fire risk as they aren't really designed to be always on so you might want to set it up that they only switch on in certain circumstances.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Sp@ce_d said:

My Obsy is wood and has ventilation so not too bad. The only thing that seems to have been killed by damp over the past few years in my Obsy was a PC, and that was because I shut it down & left it for a year or so. The motherboard had pretty bad corrosion, lasted a few years when left on tho. I have a dehumidifier but don't use it all the time. It's automatically switched on/off when the obsy closes/opens.  Runs on a timer, can set humidity etc.. I usually have it set to run for a couple of hours after close unless the humidity is particularly high and the kits very wet. Got it from these guys.. https://www.dry-it-out.com/dry/observatories.html

Thanks.

I will have a look at these.

Mick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Whirlwind said:

A lot of remote observatories are located in dry locations (as high humidity also means cloud and rain) so it's less of an issue for these types of locations.  It is the external electronics you need to think about as well as connectors.  Most CCDs/CMOS are in purged chambers with some manner of reducing any moisture in the chamber (otherwise you get ice on the chip).  You never want any electronics sopping wet (that includes the mount) and you also have to be careful with the telescope as well because of mould or rusting cells etc.

Good dehumidifiers can be expensive but they are still cheaper than replacing the telescope equipment!  Think of it as insurance.  Dew heater bands are possible but is a bit of a fire risk as they aren't really designed to be always on so you might want to set it up that they only switch on in certain circumstances.

Hi.

I take your point,and of course you dont want sopping electronics,but again these cameras must be built to cope with this.Those who image outside and not in an observatory  must be very prone to sopping cameras when there is a heavy dew,yes they then take their camera inside to dry off,but the camera has still been exsposed to wet conditions.

As to a Dehumidifier,my obsy is pretty well ventilated,and not really closed in when shut.Therefore i would be trying to take the moisture out of the incomming air,a losing battle methinks.

I have emailed ZWO over this,but never got a reply.

Cheers.

Mick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.