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Ideal lens for Meade Lightbridge 130 to view Saturn


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Hi. Complete newbie to the hobby here. Just purchased a Meade Lightbridge 130 for my daughter as an upgrade to her Skywatcher Infinity 76. I'd like for her to see the rings of Saturn sometime with her new scope. Would getting a better lens improve her chances of a good view of the rings of Saturn? And if so, what lens would you recommend. Thank you

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Since it came with a 9mm eyepiece of unknown quality yielding 650/9=72x, that should be enough to easily resolve Saturn's rings and some of its moons.  However, if you want to push up the power some, I would recommend getting a 5mm BST Starguider, Dual ED, or AT Paradigm (they're all the same) for 650/5=130x.  It's a very good eyepiece with comfortable eye relief and generous 60 degree apparent field of view.  At 130x, you might start to resolve the Cassini division in the rings.

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42 minutes ago, Louis D said:

Since it came with a 9mm eyepiece of unknown quality yielding 650/9=72x, that should be enough to easily resolve Saturn's rings and some of its moons.  However, if you want to push up the power some, I would recommend getting a 5mm BST Starguider, Dual ED, or AT Paradigm (they're all the same) for 650/5=130x.  It's a very good eyepiece with comfortable eye relief and generous 60 degree apparent field of view.  At 130x, you might start to resolve the Cassini division in the rings.

Thank you very much Louis. I shall *take a look at those (pun intended)

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23 hours ago, Louis D said:

Since it came with a 9mm eyepiece of unknown quality yielding 650/9=72x, that should be enough to easily resolve Saturn's rings and some of its moons.  However, if you want to push up the power some, I would recommend getting a 5mm BST Starguider, Dual ED, or AT Paradigm (they're all the same) for 650/5=130x.  It's a very good eyepiece with comfortable eye relief and generous 60 degree apparent field of view.  At 130x, you might start to resolve the Cassini division in the rings.

+1 for the BST, and FLO even have them in stock which is a bonus in the current climate.

image.png.4a03cffc5932e9b400f77a6274249e7c.png 

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