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Hubble Deep Field Image


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Hello all.

I wondered if anyone has ever had a bash at doing something similar to the Hubble deep space image.

I realise we don't have anything like the equipment / resolution etc that Hubble has, but would be interested to see what anyone's similar efforts were like.  

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Near the Hamburger galaxy (NGC3628) there are these quasars that are suggested to be between 4 and 10 Giga light years away: http://www.waid-observatory.com/ngc3628-2016-03-31-quasars.html Back i

That would be a nice challenge for the winter months. The deepest I can get atm is measured in meters, not Mly.

Surely, text messages would have been faster. 😋

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I remember Robbie Ince did a study of the Hubble Deep Field area from a Kielder Star Party, a number of years back, to find out how deep he could see with his astrophotography setup.

I can't seem to find much online about it though.

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There are some who have had a go at it.  I have a feeling Silent Running might be one.  (I also have a feeling therte are two Silent Running's on here so it is John Hawke I am referring to.

Carole  

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5 hours ago, Freddie said:

Like this you mean??!!

 

Thanks for that freddie, some good results there from a few of the contributors, especially @paulobao from Portugal. 

Also found the thread from @robbieince and his efforts were even more amazing with his Kielder deep field result. Wonder what gear he used, couldn't find that information on report other than camera. KDF report here KDF Report

@Davey-T makes a good point, with the advances in modern cameras such as the ZWO 6200 model and a decent apertured ota might be able to yield some good results. Dark, settled skies the key here though. 

Doubt my outfit would yield anything, but would be willing to give it a whirl.

 

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I managed IC 4285 back in the spring when I first started at a Distance of 1,023 M light years, this as far as I know is the furthest smudge of light I have ever recorded, you know that wow factor when you see Saturn the first time, well when processed the image it was like that. When I explain to people how far it is, I have to explain that in the entirety of our solar system's life there would have only been time for 2 radio messages between that galaxy and our own solar system, that is 2 each way, then I generally find I have to explain the speed of light and radio wave's ect.....

 

If this is not the sort of thing this post is about ignore the above.

Edited by Nicola Hannah Butterfield
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20 minutes ago, Nicola Hannah Butterfield said:

there would have only been time for 2 radio messages between that galaxy and our own solar system, that is 2 each way, then I generally find I have to explain the speed of light and radio wave's ect.....

Surely, text messages would have been faster. 😋

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7 hours ago, Nicola Hannah Butterfield said:

I managed IC 4285 back in the spring when I first started at a Distance of 1,023 M light years, this as far as I know is the furthest smudge of light I have ever recorded, you know that wow factor when you see Saturn the first time, well when processed the image it was like that. When I explain to people how far it is, I have to explain that in the entirety of our solar system's life there would have only been time for 2 radio messages between that galaxy and our own solar system, that is 2 each way, then I generally find I have to explain the speed of light and radio wave's ect.....

 

If this is not the sort of thing this post is about ignore the above.

3C273 at 2.5 billion light years is a very easy object to image too.  Quite easy to see as well with a reasonable size scope.

https://skastro.net/quasar-3c273-in-virgo/

(website in development btw)

Back on topic, definitely one for Spring/Summer skies permitting.

 

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Not the hubble deep field, but quite deep anyway, this is what I achieved last spring with my setup.

The only reason I hesitate to do a deep field in the UMa area is that there's nothing else in the fov to make an image interesting. As clear nights are rare, I feel I would be "wasting" good imaging time.

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I guess any object is worth the clear sky time if it sparks your interest. I’m definitely going to spend time attempting to  image the visible jet from 3C273 when it comes around in the Spring.

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1 hour ago, kirkster501 said:

3C273 at 2.5 billion light years is a very easy object to image too.  Quite easy to see as well with a reasonable size scope.

https://skastro.net/quasar-3c273-in-virgo/

(website in development btw)

Back on topic, definitely one for Spring/Summer skies permitting.

 

I will try next spring, if I remember. I am still getting my head around some hard wear things. I got a bit peeved off at having to have subs less than 30's at some points, back in the early summer and then well the cloud since the dawn of time, and a little mechanical during the recent clearer spell, you watch once back up and running cloud will be till Feb.

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18 minutes ago, tomato said:

I guess any object is worth the clear sky time if it sparks your interest. I’m definitely going to spend time attempting to  image the visible jet from 3C273 when it comes around in the Spring.

I bow out on that one. Did a quick search on astrobin, and it looks beyond the fl of my scope.

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3C 273 can be observed visually too and is on my list. It is available from early January if you are dedicated (read slightly mad) enough but March is more reasonable as it is to the right of Virgo. 

I had bookmarked it to visual but might have a go at imaging. 

 

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7 hours ago, bomberbaz said:

3C 273 can be observed visually too and is on my list. It is available from early January if you are dedicated (read slightly mad) enough but March is more reasonable as it is to the right of Virgo. 

I had bookmarked it to visual but might have a go at imaging. 

 

Yes, a 6" aperture and 3C273 is observable.  Done so myself with the Dob.  It is quite amazing to think the light has travelled for 2.5billion years prior to it hitting the back of my retina.

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I did try the Hubble test from April 2015 using my C1100 setup, but without success. However, last year I did start a project on NGC1073, and in the attached (very heavily cropped) image I reckon that I have captured three quasars. I find it almost impossible to ascertain their distance, but from various research papers, their distances range from 6 to 15 billion lightyears (15 billion lightyears equating to around 10.3 billion years in time because of the expanding universe.) Perhaps someone could enlighten me further??? But as Nicola Hannah Butterfield pointed out above, those smudges of light really do have a wow factor - for me, anyway.......

Chris

 

139700099_NGC1073quasars.jpg.c35a62d839c6ca49e4c12fcb68546780.jpg

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2 hours ago, cfpendock said:

I did try the Hubble test from April 2015 using my C1100 setup, but without success. However, last year I did start a project on NGC1073, and in the attached (very heavily cropped) image I reckon that I have captured three quasars. I find it almost impossible to ascertain their distance, but from various research papers, their distances range from 6 to 15 billion lightyears (15 billion lightyears equating to around 10.3 billion years in time because of the expanding universe.) Perhaps someone could enlighten me further??? But as Nicola Hannah Butterfield pointed out above, those smudges of light really do have a wow factor - for me, anyway.......

Chris

 

139700099_NGC1073quasars.jpg.c35a62d839c6ca49e4c12fcb68546780.jpg

 

Very, very impressed with the image, although your arrow drawings are pretty rubbish 😅  Sorry forgive me soh.

Do you have references for the quasars? Find this stuff fascinating.

I assume the mass we are looking at in the centre is galaxy core?

 

Edited by bomberbaz
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Near the Hamburger galaxy (NGC3628) there are these quasars that are suggested to be between 4 and 10 Giga light years away: http://www.waid-observatory.com/ngc3628-2016-03-31-quasars.html

Back in 2017 I could just barely make them out with a 5" refractor and DSLR:

https://www.astrobin.com/288366/

I should be able to do that better now, and many of you will probably already have them in your Hamburger images.

Here is the image from the Waid Observatory:

ngc3628-2016-03-31-Quasar-1024.jpg

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14 hours ago, bomberbaz said:

although your arrow drawings are pretty rubbish

Thanks, Steve.  I know, obviously it was the excitement of actually being able to see the quasars.  And to think that those photons started out on their jouney so many billions of years ago, eventually finding their way to my village, my telescope, and then landing on my camera sensor.  Makes you appreciate the enormous power of these things.

One day I will finish the image of NGC 1073, although it is rather small - somewhat less than 5' of arc, but weather etc.....

 

3 hours ago, gorann said:

Back in 2017 I could just barely make them out with a 5" refractor and DSLR

But pretty incredible all the same, for the reasons I gave above.

 

Chris

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