Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_2.thumb.jpg.72789c04780d7659f5b63ea05534a956.jpg

Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

I am pretty new to this forum. Well, have been following it for quite a while but this is the first time I am writing something.

 

I am selling my ASI 1600MM Pro that I bought from FLO on February 2020. It has been a great camera, and even with my Celestron NexStar 8SE scope and Bortle Class 8, it gave me great results. It doesn't have any mechanical or other problem, the reason I am selling this is to move to a new camera :)

 

Let me know if you are interested in.

 

The price I have in my mind is £1000.

 

Here are some pictures I took with this camera ;

Bubble.png

Crescent.jpg

Heart.jpg

M51.jpg

Pacman.jpg

Edited by 3rkunt
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Marmo720 said:

I think £1000. I had to read it twice as well as it looks like they got a bargain from FLO at £1000 from first reading :) 

Yeah, on a second reading I agree! I also wondered how they'd gone up so much since earlier in the year!

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Supply and demand.

These days, lots of desirable astronomy equipment is out of stock, so many resort to buying used.

A rough rule of thumb is approximately 25% to 30% price reduction compared to new equipment, but these days it's a seller's market.

N.F.

 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, 3rkunt said:

Sorry for the confusion, it looks like the price I had in my mind was not really visible in the first post :) My mistake.

Do you think I am over-pricing it with £1000 ?

Sorry, I'd just misread the ad. I'd like one of these but don't have £1000 spare, maybe next year!

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, nfotis said:

Supply and demand.

These days, lots of desirable astronomy equipment is out of stock, so many resort to buying used.

A rough rule of thumb is approximately 25% to 30% price reduction compared to new equipment, but these days it's a seller's market.

N.F.

 

60-65% of new price is the norm for good secondhand kit, so that would equate to 35% - 40% reduction...👍

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By DeepSkyBrad
      I've just had a Canon EOS 250d modified by Juan, IR filter off and shim to restore focal plane.  He previously did the same for a 100d which got me going in the hobby.  Juan is willing and able to take on successive generations of camera.  I prefer to rely on Juan's experience for this task, despite me being an optics specialist professionally.   The cost of the camera and Juan's conversion service together are a bargain and I trust him with a new camera.   
      I like to use this type of imager over the specialist cameras because they are the result of Canon's massive R&D capability and bundle together all these functions:  battery, an up to date sensor chip, the on-board software, on-board storage, built-in display, easy-fit Astronomik filter. In the case of the 250d, that very important tiltable display so you don't have to crawl around on the wet lawn to see it.  The only thing they don't have is an easily-implemented thermo-electric cooling.  But I've got a long way to go in astro-imaging before I care about noise that much (though I'd like to cool, and understand what can be achieved, I use stacking averaging in the meantime to go part way in that respect).
      The dslr is my one imager for three rigs, the most notable being that it's lightweight enough to go on my Omegon clockwork mount. 
      On my heftier rig, I do have an Altair camera with a Sony back-lit chip but only use it for tracking with a wireless-controlled Stellarmate setup, having got fed up with all the cables and tablet pc with memory dangling off it.  
    • By JemC
      Hi all,
      Not sure which section to put this in? getting started or cameras, (Mods please move if necessary)
      Need a little help/advice/recommendations,
      I have been away from my telescope/astrophotography for about 2 maybe 3 years, i kind of lost the mojo for it, but now looking to get back to it,  So i'm looking for camera advice/help,
      Previously i only ever used a DSLR for astrophotography, however i am thinking do i stick with that or do i get something different? I know there will be a learning curve with new camera setup,
      My area of interest is/would be Nebulae and Galaxies,i know there is no one camera fits all kind of thing, so Nebulae would be my main interest with Galaxies coming 2nd.
      My current scope is the (Older Blue Model) Sky-Watcher Evostar 80 DS-PRO ED, so with that in mind what would be a good camera to pair that with, colour or mono i'm not fussed really,
      My budget for new/2nd hand camera is £700 but could maybe stretch to £800.
      Any help/advice (good or bad) will be greatly appreciated. 
      Regards
      JemC
    • By billyb93
      I currently have a Canon T6 with a Opteka 500mm f8 lens ($87) that I use for lunar and solar photography. I recently purchased a full frame Canon EOS R and am thinking about getting a 800mm f11 Canon RF lens ($899). Will the quality on the new canon lens be significantly better than my Opteka lens? Is it worth the upgrade? Also, should I use my new full frame or my crop sensor (1.6 factor) to shoot? I want to get the best quality possible. 
    • By pblackwell
      Hi everyone,
      What camera would you recommend to use with my Celestron SCT 9.25” ?
      I would prefer a proper astrophotography camera rather than a DSLR.
      I already have a focal reducer and would mostly want deep sky if possible (although my telescope may be too high mag for that), but would also enjoy planetary.
      Any advice would be great guys.
      Many thanks!
      Paul
       
    • By Padraic M
      I spent the full night out last night and got 6 hours of Ha lights on the Bubble and the Horsehead. Reasonably pleased with the results, but even though I followed my usual process and got good focus statistics in APT, I am slightly out of focus with roundy stars and some are even slightly donutty. Samples are attached below.
      Problem:
      - After getting close to spot-on focus, the APT Bahtinov Aid showed a focus distance oscillating from -0.02 to +0.02. Seeing seemed good to the inexpert eye. Not so sure about transparency as there was some thin, wispy cloud throughout the night. So, I started the night's imaging with focus 'Close' rather than 'On' focus.
      - Different subs show different quality stars, ranging from small donuts to circles.
      Background information:
      - HEQ5 Pro Rowan; SW Esprit 80 with field flattener, SW stock manual Crayford focuser; ZWO EFW Mini; Baader 1.25" 3.5nm Ha filter; ZWO ASI1600MM Pro binned 1x1 @ -20c.
      - AA Starwave 50mm guidescope with ZWO ASI290mm Mini guidecam binned 2x2.
      - All subs are 300s, gain 139, offset 10.
      - Polar alignment with Sharpcap to 17 arcsec ("Excellent"); capture with APT; guiding with Phd2. Focus with Bahtinov mask and APT Bahtinov Aid. Stacked in DSS with Darks, Flats and Dark Flats.
      - Mount is well balanced in RA, but is very camera-heavy in Dec.
      - PHD2 guiding was around 2"/px. Imaging pixel scale is 1.9"/px.
      Questions:
      - Do I put the round stars down to seeing, given that the Bahtinov Aid focus distance was bouncing equally above and below zero?
      - Can poor seeing cause the donut stars?
      - Would an electronic auto-focuser do any better in this situation?
      - Would the Seeing Monitor in Sharpcap give useful information? I didn't think to use it last night.
      - Could my guiding performance, and possibly the Dec balance, have affected the image quality in this way?
      - What are my options in future - abandon imaging for the night? Bin all images in software 2x2 or 4x4 to sharpen the stars at the expense of lower resolution?
      - Other suggestions?
      Sample 1: Detail from a single 5-min sub of Bubble nebula at 100% showing round stars, and a blurred bubble.

      Sample 2: Detail from a different sub of the Bubble nebula at 400% showing donuts

       
      Sample 3: Detail from a 5-min sub of the Horsehead nebula at 100%, showing both round and donut stars

       
      Finally, both images stacked, calibrated and stretched, scaled to 4x4 in Gimp. 28x300s Ha on bubble, 22*300s Ha on horsehead.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.