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Good afternoon forum,

I went out last night to see what I could see, when I noticed a fuzzy patch of light to the, I guess magnetic south, of the tail of Cygnus, Deneb. It was visible to the naked eye, so I grabbed a pair of binoculars for a better look. Through the binoculars it looked to be roughly hourglass shaped 'glow'. I grabbed my camera to take some pictures and this is what I got. I know that my tracking was a bit off due to me wanting to get a picture quickly, as noted by a bit of star elongation, but after the first image, I just  wanted to get more images. From what I could tell it appeared to be moving from east to west, in a west-south-west direction until fading completely. The movement was visible to the naked eye, so it wasn't completely a result of the misalignment. I believe that all images where 25-30 sec exposures, the first 4 are at a fl of 200mm, the last 2 at 70mm. There is a bit of wiggle as I tried to center it between shots, which I did a terrible job at. Can anyone help identify what this is? 

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Thanks for the information. I’m still fairly new to the hobby and I rather quickly drew a blank as to what would cause something like that. Thank you again, and I look forward to learning and seeing more with the community

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